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Daidzein-metabolising phenotypes in relation to serum lipids and uric acid in adults in Guangzhou, China

  • Kaiping Guo (a1), Bo Zhang (a1), Chaogang Chen (a2), Shigeto Uchiyama (a3), Tomomi Ueno (a3), Yuming Chen (a4) and Yixiang Su (a1)...

Abstract

Previous studies have suggested that daidzein's metabolites, equol and O-desmethylangolensin (O-DMA), rather than daidzein itself may contribute to the beneficial effects of soya foods in the prevention of CVD. The present study aims to assess the proportion of equol and O-DMA producers, and to compare differences in anthropometric factors, serum lipids, glucose and uric acid between producers and non-producers in Chinese adults aged 20–69 years. For the present cross-sectional study, 202 subjects (100 women and 102 men) were recruited. Twenty-four-hour urinary daidzein and its metabolites were determined in these subjects while on their usual diet and again after a 3-d isoflavone challenge. Fasting serum lipids, glucose and uric acid were examined on their usual diet. Three days of 24 h dietary recalls were used to assess dietary intakes. Of the 202 subjects, 27 (13·4 %) and 27 (13·4 %) excreted equol and O-DMA on their usual diet, and 101 (50 %) and 94 (46·5 %) produced equol and O-DMA after a load of 80 mg/d isoflavones. Equol producers showed lower serum uric acid ( − 10·2 %, P = 0·001), TAG ( − 29·5 %, P = 0·007) and waist:hip ratio ( − 2·6 %, P = 0·032), and tended to have higher HDL cholesterol (6·3 %, P = 0·069) compared with equol non-producers. There were no significant differences in serum lipids, glucose and uric acid between O-DMA producers and non-producers. In conclusion, equol phenotypes might influence cardiovascular risk.

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Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Professor Yixiang Su, fax +86 20 8733 3166, email suyx@mail.sysu.edu.cn

References

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Keywords

Daidzein-metabolising phenotypes in relation to serum lipids and uric acid in adults in Guangzhou, China

  • Kaiping Guo (a1), Bo Zhang (a1), Chaogang Chen (a2), Shigeto Uchiyama (a3), Tomomi Ueno (a3), Yuming Chen (a4) and Yixiang Su (a1)...

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