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Consumption of a calcium and vitamin D-fortified food product does not affect iron status during initial military training: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

  • Stephen R. Hennigar (a1), Erin Gaffney-Stomberg (a2), Laura J. Lutz (a1), Sonya J. Cable (a3), Stefan M. Pasiakos (a1), Andrew J. Young (a1) and James P. McClung (a1)...

Abstract

Ca/vitamin D supplementation maintains bone health and decreases stress fracture risk during initial military training (IMT); however, there is evidence that Ca may negatively affect the absorption of other critical micronutrients, particularly Fe. The objective of this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was to determine whether providing 2000 mg/d Ca and 25µg/d vitamin D in a fortified food product during 9 weeks of military training affects Fe status in young adults. Male (n 98) and female (n 54) volunteers enrolled in US Army basic combat training (BCT) were randomised to receive a snack bar with Ca/vitamin D (n 75) or placebo (snack bar without Ca/vitamin D; n 77) and were instructed to consume 2 snack bars/d between meals throughout the training course. Circulating ionised Ca was higher (P<0·05) following BCT among those consuming the Ca/vitamin D bars compared with placebo. Fe status declined in both groups over the course of BCT. Transferrin saturation, serum ferritin and Hb were reduced (P<0·05) and soluble transferrin receptor increased (P<0·05) following BCT. There were no differences (P>0·05) in markers of Fe status between placebo and Ca/vitamin D groups. Collectively, these data indicate that Ca/vitamin D supplementation through the use of a fortified food product consumed between meals does not affect Fe status during IMT.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: J. P. McClung, fax +1 508 233 4869, email james.p.mcclung8.civ@mail.mil

Footnotes

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These authors contributed equally to this work.

Footnotes

References

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Keywords

Consumption of a calcium and vitamin D-fortified food product does not affect iron status during initial military training: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

  • Stephen R. Hennigar (a1), Erin Gaffney-Stomberg (a2), Laura J. Lutz (a1), Sonya J. Cable (a3), Stefan M. Pasiakos (a1), Andrew J. Young (a1) and James P. McClung (a1)...

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