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Acute effects of active gaming on ad libitum energy intake and appetite sensations of 8–11-year-old boys

  • Susan Allsop (a1), Caroline J. Dodd-Reynolds (a2), Benjamin P. Green (a1), Dorothée Debuse (a1) and Penny L. S. Rumbold (a1)...

Abstract

The present study examined the acute effects of active gaming on energy intake (EI) and appetite responses in 8–11-year-old boys in a school-based setting. Using a randomised cross-over design, twenty-one boys completed four individual 90-min gaming bouts, each separated by 1 week. The gaming bouts were (1) seated gaming, no food or drink; (2) active gaming, no food or drink; (3) seated gaming with food and drink offered ad libitum; and (4) active gaming with food and drink offered ad libitum. In the two gaming bouts during which foods and drinks were offered, EI was measured. Appetite sensations – hunger, prospective food consumption and fullness – were recorded using visual analogue scales during all gaming bouts at 30-min intervals and at two 15-min intervals post gaming. In the two bouts with food and drink, no significant differences were found in acute EI (MJ) (P=0·238). Significant differences were detected in appetite sensations for hunger, prospective food consumption and fullness between the four gaming bouts at various time points. The relative EI calculated for the two gaming bouts with food and drink (active gaming 1·42 (sem 0·28) MJ; seated gaming 2·12 (sem 0·25) MJ) was not statistically different. Acute EI in response to active gaming was no different from seated gaming, and appetite sensations were influenced by whether food was made available during the 90-min gaming bouts.

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Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: S. Allsop, fax +44 191 227 3190, email s.allsop@northumbria.ac.uk

References

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Keywords

Acute effects of active gaming on ad libitum energy intake and appetite sensations of 8–11-year-old boys

  • Susan Allsop (a1), Caroline J. Dodd-Reynolds (a2), Benjamin P. Green (a1), Dorothée Debuse (a1) and Penny L. S. Rumbold (a1)...

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