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Dietary inflammatory index, inflammation biomarkers and preeclampsia risk: a hospital-based case–control study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 May 2022

Yan-hua Liu
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan, People’s Republic of China
Lu Zheng
Affiliation:
Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Jinan University, No.601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China
Chen Cheng
Affiliation:
Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Jinan University, No.601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China
Shu-na Li
Affiliation:
Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Jinan University, No.601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China
Nitin Shivappa
Affiliation:
Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia, USA; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, USA; Connecting Health Innovations LLC, Columbia, USA
James R. Hebert
Affiliation:
Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia, USA; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, USA; Connecting Health Innovations LLC, Columbia, USA
Wen-jun Fu
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan, People’s Republic of China
Xian-lan Zhao
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan, People’s Republic of China
Yuan Cao
Affiliation:
The Third Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan, People’s Republic of China
Wei-feng Dou
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450000, Henan, People’s Republic of China
Hua-nan Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450000, Henan, People’s Republic of China
Dan-dan Duan
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Nutrition, Luoyang New Area People’s Hospital, Luoyang 471023, Henan, People’s Republic of China
Quan-jun Lyu
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan, People’s Republic of China Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450000, Henan, People’s Republic of China
Fang-fang Zeng*
Affiliation:
Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Jinan University, No.601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China
*
* Corresponding author: Fang-fang Zeng, email zengffjnu@126.com

Abstract

This study evaluated the association between inflammatory diets as measured by the Dietary Inflammatory index (DII), inflammation biomarkers and the development of preeclampsia among the Chinese population. We followed the reporting guidelines of the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology statement for observational studies. A total of 466 preeclampsia cases aged over 18 years were recruited between March 2016 and June 2019, and 466 healthy controls were 1:1 ratio matched by age (±3 years), week of gestation (±1 week) and gestational diabetes mellitus. The energy-adjusted DII (E-DII) was computed based on dietary intake assessed using a seventy-nine item semiquantitative FFQ. Inflammatory biomarkers were analysed by ELISA kits. The mean E-DII scores were −0·65 ± 1·58 for cases and −1·19 ± 1·47 for controls (P value < 0·001). E-DII scores positively correlated with interferon-γ (r s = 0·194, P value = 0·001) and IL-4 (r s = 0·135, P value = 0·021). After multivariable adjustment, E-DII scores were positively related to preeclampsia risk (P trend < 0·001). The highest tertile of E-DII was 2·18 times the lowest tertiles (95 % CI = 1·52, 3·13). The odds of preeclampsia increased by 30 % (95 % CI = 18 %, 43 %, P value < 0·001) for each E-DII score increase. The preeclampsia risk was positively associated with IL-2 (OR = 1·07, 95 % CI = 1·03, 1·11), IL-4 (OR = 1·26, 95 % CI = 1·03, 1·54) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) (OR = 1·17, 95 % CI = 1·06, 1·29). Therefore, proinflammatory diets, corresponding to higher IL-2, IL-4 and TGF-β levels, were associated with increased preeclampsia risk.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

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Footnotes

These authors contributed equally to this work

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