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Terrorism in Pakistan: the psychosocial context and why it matters

  • Asad Tamizuddin Nizami (a1), Tariq Mahmood Hassan (a2), Sadia Yasir (a3), Mowaddat Hussain Rana (a4) and Fareed Aslam Minhas (a5)...

Abstract

Terrorism is often construed as a well-thought-out, extreme form of violence to perceived injustices. The after effects of terrorism are usually reported without understanding the underlying psychological and social determinants of the terrorist act. Since ‘9/11’ Pakistan has been at the epicentre of both terrorism and the war against it. This special paper helps to explain the psychosocial perspective of terrorism in Pakistan that leads to violent radicalisation. It identifies the terrorist acts in the background of Pakistan's history, current geopolitical and social scenario. The findings may also act as a guide on addressing this core issue.

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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.

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Terrorism in Pakistan: the psychosocial context and why it matters

  • Asad Tamizuddin Nizami (a1), Tariq Mahmood Hassan (a2), Sadia Yasir (a3), Mowaddat Hussain Rana (a4) and Fareed Aslam Minhas (a5)...

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