Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Preposition stranding and orphaning: The case of bare prepositions in French

  • GEORG A. KAISER (a1)

Extract

In their keynote contribution, Poplack, Zentz & Dion (henceforth PZD; Poplack, Zentz & Dion, 2011, this issue) propose an interesting “scientific test of convergence” (under section heading: “Introduction”) which contains criteria to check whether a particular feature in a given language in contact with another one is due to language contact or not. This is a valiant endeavor with a laudable goal. It is valiant because the answer to this question requires a complex investigation of the languages at issue. It is laudable since it is commonly believed that a given feature of a language in contact with another one is the result of convergence. This belief however is, in general, only a mere conjecture due to superficial similarities of the features at issue, for which no empirical evidence is provided. Yet, there is no doubt that PZD accomplish their endeavor in an outstanding manner. Based on a thorough study of substantial data from Canadian French and Canadian English, they demonstrate in a convincing way how it is possible to reveal whether a given feature is contact-induced or not.

Copyright

References

Hide All
Grevisse, M., & Goosse, A. (2007). Le bon usage. Grammaire française (14e edition). Brussels: De Boek & Larcier.
Jones, M. A. (1996). Foundations of French syntax. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Poplack, S., & Levey, S. (2010). Contact-induced grammatical change: A cautionary tale. In Auer, P. & Schmidt, J. E. (eds.), Language and space: An international handbook of linguistic variation (vol. 1): Theories and methods, pp. 391419. Berlin: de Gruyter.
Poplack, S., Zentz, L., & Dion, N. (2011). Phrase-final prepositions in Quebec French: An empirical study of contact, code-switching and resistance to convergence. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, doi:10.1017/S1366728911000204. Published by Cambridge University Press, 11 August 2011.
Porquier, R. (2001). “Il m'a sauté dessus”, “je lui ai couru après”: un cas de postposition en français. Journal of French Language Studies, 11, 123134.
Radford, A. (1997). Syntactic theory and the structure of English: A minimalist approach. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Riegel, M., Pellat, J. C., & Rioul, R. (2008). Grammaire méthodique du français (3e edition). Paris: Presses Universitaires de France.
Rowlett, P. (2007). The syntax of French. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed