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Natural codeswitching knocks on the laboratory door

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 June 2006


CAROL MYERS-SCOTTON
Affiliation:
University of South Carolina

Abstract

This contribution discusses findings and hypotheses from empirical data of naturally-occurring codeswitching. The discussion is framed by some comparisons of the approaches of contact linguists and psycholinguists to bilingual production data. However, it emphasizes the relevance of naturally-occurring codeswitching to the theoretical questions asked by psycholinguists. To accomplish this, relevant grammatical structures in codeswitching are exemplified and analyzed. Analysis largely follows the Matrix Language Frame (MLF) model, but differing approaches are mentioned.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Cambridge University Press 2006

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Footnotes

I thank Albert Costa for commenting extensively on earlier versions of this manuscript and for advice from Judith Kroll. Discussions with Jan Jake helped throughout the lengthy process of arriving at the final manuscript. Of course only I am responsible for what appears here.

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