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A rejoinder: ‘How can experiments play a greater role in public policy? Twelve proposals from an economic model of scaling’

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 September 2020

OMAR AL-UBAYDLI
Affiliation:
Bahrain Center for Strategic, International and Energy Studies, Manama, Bahrain Department of Economics and the Mercatus Center, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, USA College of Industrial Management, King Fahad University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia
MIN SOK LEE
Affiliation:
Kenneth C. Griffin Department of Economics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA
JOHN A. LIST
Affiliation:
Kenneth C. Griffin Department of Economics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia NBER, Cambridge, MA, USA
CLAIRE L. MACKEVICIUS
Affiliation:
School of Education and Social Policy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA
DANA SUSKIND
Affiliation:
Professor of Surgery and Pediatric, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA Co-Director, TMW Center for Early Learning + Public Health, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

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Type
Response
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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References

Al-Ubaydli, O., List, J. A. and Suskind, D. (2019), The Science of Using Science: Towards an Understanding of the Threats to Scaling Experiments, (NBER Working Paper No. 25848).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Al-Ubaydli, O., Lee, M. S., List, J. A. and Suskind, D. (2020), ‘How can experiments play a greater role in public policy? Twelve proposals from an economic model of scaling’, Behavioral Public Policy, this issue.Google Scholar
Czibor, E., Jimenez-Gomez, D. & List, J. A. (2019), ‘The Dozen Things Experimental Economists Should Do (More of)’, Southern Economic Journal, 86(2): 371432.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Harrison, G. W. (2020), ‘Field experiments and public policy: festina lente’, Behavioral Public Policy, this issue.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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John, P. (2020), ‘Let's walk before we can run: the uncertain demand from policymakers for trials’, Behavioral Public Policy, this issue.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
List, J. A. (2011), ‘The Market for Charitable Giving’. Journal of Economic Perspectives, 25(2): 157180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mani, A. (2020), ‘Experimental evidence, scaling and public policy: a perspective from developing countries’, Behavioral Public Policy, this issue.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McConnell, S. (2020), ‘How can experiments play a greater role in public policy? Three notions from behavioral psychology’, Behavioral Public Policy, this issue.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Raudenbush, S. W. (2020), ‘Scaling up experiments to reduce educational inequality’, Behavioral Public Policy, this issue.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Soman, D. and Hossain, T. (2020), ‘Successfully scaled solutions need not be homogeneous’, Behavioral Public Policy, this issue.10.1017/bpp.2020.24CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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A rejoinder: ‘How can experiments play a greater role in public policy? Twelve proposals from an economic model of scaling’
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