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Childhood Anxiety in Ethnic Families: Current Status and Future Directions

  • Paula M. Barrett (a1), Cynthia M. Turner (a2) and Robi Sonderegger (a3)

Abstract

Australia is a culturally diverse country with many migrant families in need of support and assistance from clinical psychologists. Yet, surveys indicate that migrants do not feel comfortable in accessing community mental health services, due to the lack of cultural sensitivity and understanding of our current practices. Despite this finding, there remains a paucity of research on migrant families, their different values and needs, and how they adjust to the Australian culture. The present article reviews research on migrant children, their characteristics, and the factors that help or hinder healthy adjustment to a new culture. This review focuses particularly on anxiety, which is not only the most common form of childhood psychopathology, but also frequently coincides with stressful life events such as migration. Our review concludes with recommendations for the development of assessment and intervention protocols, and areas of future research.

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Corresponding author

*Address for correspondence: Paula M. Barrett, School of Applied Psychology, Griffith University, Mt. Gravatt Campus, Mt. Gravatt QLD 4111, Australia.

Childhood Anxiety in Ethnic Families: Current Status and Future Directions

  • Paula M. Barrett (a1), Cynthia M. Turner (a2) and Robi Sonderegger (a3)

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