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Between-group attack and defence in an ecological setting: Insights from nonhuman animals

  • Andrew N. Radford (a1), Susanne Schindler (a1) and Tim W. Fawcett (a2)

Abstract

Attempts to understand the fundamental forces shaping conflict between attacking and defending groups can be hampered by a narrow focus on humans and reductionist, oversimplified modelling. Further progress depends on recognising the striking parallels in between-group conflict across the animal kingdom, harnessing the power of experimental tests in nonhuman species and modelling the eco-evolutionary feedbacks that drive attack and defence.

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Between-group attack and defence in an ecological setting: Insights from nonhuman animals

  • Andrew N. Radford (a1), Susanne Schindler (a1) and Tim W. Fawcett (a2)

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