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Coalitionary psychology and group dynamics on social media

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 July 2022

Jeff Deminchuk
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Regina, Regina, SK S4S 0A2, Canada jeff.deminchuk@gmail.com
Sandeep Mishra
Affiliation:
Lang School of Business & Economics, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada sandeep.mishra@uoguelph.ca; sandeepmishra.ca

Abstract

Pietraszewski's model allows understanding group dynamics through the lens of evolved coalitionary psychology. This framework is particularly relevant to understanding group dynamics on social media platforms, where coalitions based on salience of group identity are prominent and generate unique frictions. We offer testable hypotheses derived from the model that may help to shed light on social media behavior.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press

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