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Intra-population variability of the non-breeding distribution of southern giant petrels Macronectes giganteus is mediated by individual body size

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 July 2018

Lucas Krüger
Affiliation:
MARE – Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia Antárctico de Pesquisas Ambientais - INCT-APA, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil Instituto Antártico Chileno, Plaza Muñoz Gamero 1055, Punta Arenas, Chile
Vitor H. Paiva
Affiliation:
MARE – Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
Julia V.G. Finger
Affiliation:
Laboratório de Ornitologia e Animais Marinhos, Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos, São Leopoldo, RS, Brazil Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia Antárctico de Pesquisas Ambientais - INCT-APA, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
Elisa Petersen
Affiliation:
Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia Antárctico de Pesquisas Ambientais - INCT-APA, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil Instituto Oceanográfico da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
José C. Xavier
Affiliation:
MARE – Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal British Antarctic Survey, NERC, Cambridge, UK
Maria V. Petry
Affiliation:
Laboratório de Ornitologia e Animais Marinhos, Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos, São Leopoldo, RS, Brazil Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia Antárctico de Pesquisas Ambientais - INCT-APA, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
Jaime A. Ramos
Affiliation:
MARE – Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Literature reports that body size can be associated with latitudinal distribution, for instance larger animals inhabit higher latitudes and colder habitats. This rule can be applied for species and populations within a species. The potential influence of body size on non-breeding distribution and habitat use at the intra-population level was investigated for southern giant petrels Macronectes giganteus (Gmelin) from Elephant Island, South Shetland Islands. The non-breeding distribution of 23 individuals was tracked, and total body length, culmen length, wing length, wing load and body mass were measured. Positions of core areas were used to estimate the latitudinal distribution of each individual. Smaller individuals were found to be associated more with lower latitudes, where warmer conditions and more coastal and productive waters prevail, whereas large males were associated more with higher latitudes, with colder conditions near sea ice caps, presumably feeding on carrion or preying on penguins. This association reflects a latitudinal gradient, with smaller individuals positioning themselves towards the north, and larger individuals towards the south. In this case, body size, individual distribution and habitat use were found to be associated, highlighting the importance of studying potential effects of individual body size on the ecology of seabirds.

Type
Biological Sciences
Copyright
© Antarctic Science Ltd 2018 

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