Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Microbial phytase addition resulted in a greater increase in phosphorus digestibility in dry-fed compared with liquid-fed non-heat-treated wheat–barley–maize diets for pigs

  • K. Blaabjerg (a1), A.-M. Thomassen (a1) and H. D. Poulsen (a1)

Abstract

The objective was to evaluate the effect of microbial phytase (1250 FTU/kg diet with 88% dry matter (DM)) on apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of phosphorus (P) in pigs fed a dry or soaked diet. Twenty-four pigs (65±3 kg) from six litters were used. Pigs were housed in metabolism crates and fed one of four diets for 12 days; 5 days for adaptation and 7 days for total, but separate collection of feces and urine. The basal diet was composed of wheat, barley, maize, soybean meal and no mineral phosphate. Dietary treatments were: basal dry-fed diet (BDD), BDD with microbial phytase (BDD+phy), BDD soaked for 24 h at 20°C before feeding (BDS) and BDS with microbial phytase (BDS+phy). Supplementation of microbial phytase increased ATTD of DM and crude protein (N×6.25) by 2 and 3 percentage units (P<0.0001; P<0.001), respectively. The ATTD of P was affected by the interaction between microbial phytase and soaking (P=0.02). This was due to a greater increase in ATTD of P by soaking of the diet containing solely plant phytase compared with the diet supplemented with microbial phytase: 35%, 65%, 44% and 68% for BDD, BDD+phy, BSD and BSD+phy, respectively. As such, supplementation of microbial phytase increased ATTD of P in the dry-fed diet, but not in the soaked diet. The higher ATTD of P for BDS compared with BDD resulted from the degradation of 54% of the phytate in BDS by wheat and barley phytases during soaking. On the other hand, soaking of BDS+phy did not increase ATTD of P significantly compared with BDD+phy despite that 76% of the phytate in BDS+phy was degraded before feeding. In conclusion, soaking of BDS containing solely plant phytase provided a great potential for increasing ATTD of P. However, this potential was not present when microbial phytase (1250 FTU/kg diet) was supplemented, most likely because soaking of BDS+phy for 24 h at 20°C did not result in a complete degradation of phytate before feeding.

Copyright

Corresponding author

References

Hide All
Adeola, O and Sands, JS 2003. Does supplemental dietary microbial phytase improve amino acid utilization? A perspective that it does not. Journal of Animal Science 81, E78E85.
Association of Official Analytical Chemist (AOAC) 2000a. Official methods of analysis, 17th edition. AOAC, Arlington, VA, USA. Method 975.03.
Association of Official Analytical Chemist (AOAC) 2000b. Official methods of analysis, 17th edition. AOAC, Arlington, VA, USA. Method 984.13.
Blaabjerg, K, Nørgaard, JV and Poulsen, HD 2012a. Effect of microbial phytase on phosphorus digestibility in non-heat-treated and heat-treated wheat-barley pig diets. Journal of Animal Science 90, 206208.
Blaabjerg, K, Strathe, AB and Poulsen, HD 2012b. Modelling phytate degradation kinetics in soaked wheat and barley. Animal Feed Science and Technology 175, 4856.
Blaabjerg, K, Carlsson, NG, Hansen-Møller, J and Poulsen, HD 2010a. Effect of heat-treatment, phytase, xylanase and soaking time on inositol phosphate degradation in vitro in wheat, soybean meal and rapeseed cake. Animal Feed Science and Technology 162, 123134.
Blaabjerg, K, Jørgensen, H, Tauson, A-H and Poulsen, HD 2010b. Heat-treatment, phytase and fermented liquid feeding affect the presence of inositol phosphates in ileal digesta and phosphorus digestibility in pigs fed a wheat and barley diet. Animal 4, 876885.
Blaabjerg, K, Jørgensen, H, Tauson, A-H and Poulsen, HD 2011. The presence of inositol phosphates in gastric pig digesta is affected by time after feeding a non-fermented or fermented liquid wheat-barley based diet. Journal of Animal Science 89, 31533162.
Carlson, D and Poulsen, HD 2003. Phytate degradation in soaked and fermented liquid feed – effect of diet, time of soaking, heat treatment, phytase activity, pH and temperature. Animal Feed Science and Technology 103, 141154.
Eeckhout, W and De Paepe, M 1994. Total phosphorus, phytate-phosphorus and phytase activity in plant feedstuffs. Animal Feed Science and Technology 47, 1929.
Engelen, AJ, Vanderheeft, FC, Randsdorp, PHG and Smit Ed, LC 1994. Simple and rapid determination of phytase activity. Journal of AOAC International 77, 760764.
Fernandez, JA 1995. Calcium and phosphorus metabolism in growing pigs.1. Absorption and balance studies. Livestock Production Science 41, 233241.
Haug, W and Lantzsch, HJ 1983. Sensitive method for the rapid determination of phytate in cereals and cereal products. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 34, 14231426.
Hong, TTT, Thuy, TT, Passoth, V and Lindberg, JE 2009. Gut ecology, feed digestion and performance in weaned piglets fed liquid diets. Livestock Science 125, 232237.
Kim, JC, Sands, JS, Mullan, BP and Pluske, JR 2008. Performance and total-tract digestibility responses to exogenous xylanase and phytase in diets for growing pigs. Animal Feed Science and Technology 142, 163172.
Liao, SF, Kies, AK, Sauer, WC, Zhang, YC, Cervantes, M and He, JM 2005a. Effect of phytase supplementation to a low- and a high-phytate diet for growing pigs on the digestibilities of crude protein, amino acids, and energy. Journal of Animal Science 83, 21302136.
Liao, SF, Sauer, WC, Kies, AK, Zhang, YC, Cervantes, M and He, JM 2005b. Effect of phytase supplementation to diets for weanling pigs on the digestibilities of crude protein, amino acids, and energy. Journal of Animal Science 83, 625633.
Liu, J, Bollinger, DW, Ledoux, DR, Ellersieck, MR and Veum, TL 1997. Soaking increases the efficacy of supplemental microbial phytase in a low-phosphorus maize-soybean meal diet for growing pigs. Journal of Animal Science 75, 12921298.
Lott, JNA and Buttrose, MS 1977. Globoids in protein bodies of legume seed cotyledons. Functional Plant Biology 5, 89111.
Lyberg, K, Lundh, T, Pedersen, C and Lindberg, JE 2006. Influence of soaking, fermentation and phytase supplementation on nutrient digestibility in pigs offered a grower diet based on wheat and barley. Animal Science 82, 853858.
Lyberg, K, Andersson, HK, Sands, JS and Lindberg, JE 2008. Influence of phytase and xylanase supplementation of a wheat-based diet on digestibility and performance in growing pigs. Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica Section A – Animal Science 58, 146151.
Moore, JH and Tyler, C 1955. Studies on the intestinal absorption and excretion of calcium and phosphorus in the pig. 2. The intestinal absorption and excretion of radioactive calcium and phosphorus. British Journal of Nutrition 9, 8193.
NRC 1998. Nutrient requirements of swine, 10th revised edition. National Academy Press, Washington, DC.
O'Dell, B, de Boland, AR and Koirtyohann, SR 1972. Distribution of phytate and nutritionally important elements among the morphological components of cereals grains. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 20, 718721.
Partridge, IG 1978. Studies on digestion and absorption in the intestines of growing pigs 3. Net movements of mineral nutrients in the digestive tract. British Journal of Nutrition 39, 527536.
Pedersen, C and Stein, HH 2010. Effects of liquid and fermented liquid feeding on energy, dry matter, protein and phosphorus digestibility by growing pigs. Livestock Science 134, 5961.
Pig Research Centre 2013. Nutrient requirement standards. Retrieved 2 May 2013 from http://www.pigresearchcentre.dk/~/media/pdf/eng/Normer_naeringstoffer%20UK/Nutrient_standards_April2013.ashx
Poulsen, HD, Blaabjerg, K and Feuerstein, D 2007. Comparison of different levels and sources of microbial phytases. Livestock Production Science 109, 255257.
Prattley, CA and Stanley, DW 1982. Protein-phytate interactions in soybeans. 1. Localization of phytate in protein bodies and globoids. Journal of Food Biochemistry 6, 243253.
Raboy, V 1997. Accumulation and storage of phosphate and minerals. In Cellular and molecular biology of plant seed development (ed. BA Larkins and IK Vasil), pp. 441477. Kluwer Academic Publisher, Dordrecht, Boston, London.
Raboy, V 2003. Myo-Inositol-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate. Phytochemistry 64, 10331043.
Selle, PH and Ravindran, V 2008. Phytate-degrading enzymes in pig nutrition. Livestock Science 113, 99122.
Stein, HH, Kadzere, CT, Kim, SW and Miller, PS 2008. Influence of dietary phosphorus concentration on the digestibility of phosphorus in monocalcium phosphate by growing pigs. Journal of Animal Science 86, 18611867.
Steiner, T, Mosenthin, R, Fundis, A and Jakob, S 2006. Influence of feeding level on apparent total tract digestibility of phosphorus and calcium in pigs fed low-phosphorus diets supplemented with microbial or wheat phytase. Livestock Science 102, 110.
Stuffins, CB 1967. The determination of phosphate and calcium in feeding stuffs. Analyst 92, 107111.
Ton Nu, MA, Blaabjerg, K and Poulsen, HD 2014. Effect of screen size and phytase on phytate degradation in incubated corn and soybean meal. Animal 8, 534541.
Varley, PF, Callan, JJ and O’Doherty, JV 2011. Effect of dietary phosphorus and calcium level and phytase addition on performance, bone parameters, apparent nutrient digestibility, mineral and nitrogen utilization of weaner pigs and the subsequent effect on finisher pig bone parameters. Animal Feed Science and Technology 165, 201209.
Viveros, A, Centeno, C, Brenes, A, Canales, R and Lozano, A 2000. Phytase and acid phosphatase activities in plant feedstuffs. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 48, 40094013.
Yiu, SH, Altosaar, I and Fulcher, RG 1983. The effects of commercial processing on the structure and microchemical organization of rapeseed. Food Microstructure 2, 165173.

Keywords

Microbial phytase addition resulted in a greater increase in phosphorus digestibility in dry-fed compared with liquid-fed non-heat-treated wheat–barley–maize diets for pigs

  • K. Blaabjerg (a1), A.-M. Thomassen (a1) and H. D. Poulsen (a1)

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed