Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Article contents

Insulin-stimulating diets during the weaning-to-estrus interval do not improve fetal and placental development and uniformity in high-prolific multiparous sows

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 April 2013


J. G. M. Wientjes
Affiliation:
Wageningen University, Department of Animal Sciences, Adaptation Physiology Group, PO Box 338, 6700AH Wageningen, The Netherlands
N. M. Soede
Affiliation:
Wageningen University, Department of Animal Sciences, Adaptation Physiology Group, PO Box 338, 6700AH Wageningen, The Netherlands
B. F .A. Laurenssen
Affiliation:
Wageningen University, Department of Animal Sciences, Adaptation Physiology Group, PO Box 338, 6700AH Wageningen, The Netherlands
R. E. Koopmanschap
Affiliation:
Wageningen University, Department of Animal Sciences, Adaptation Physiology Group, PO Box 338, 6700AH Wageningen, The Netherlands
H. van den Brand
Affiliation:
Wageningen University, Department of Animal Sciences, Adaptation Physiology Group, PO Box 338, 6700AH Wageningen, The Netherlands
B. Kemp
Affiliation:
Wageningen University, Department of Animal Sciences, Adaptation Physiology Group, PO Box 338, 6700AH Wageningen, The Netherlands
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Piglet birth weight and litter uniformity are important for piglet survival. Insulin-stimulating sow diets before mating may improve subsequent piglet birth weights and litter uniformity, but the physiological mechanisms involved are not clear. This study evaluated effects of different levels of insulin-stimulating feed components (dextrose plus starch; fed twice daily) during the weaning-to-estrus interval (WEI) on plasma insulin and IGF-1 concentrations, and on follicle development and subsequent luteal, fetal and placental development and uniformity at days 42 to 43 of pregnancy. During WEI, multiparous sows were isocalorically fed diets supplemented with 375 g/day dextrose plus 375 g/day corn starch (INS-H), with 172 g/day dextrose plus 172 g/day corn starch and 144 g/day animal fat (INS-L), or with 263 g/day animal fat (CON). Jugular vein catheters were inserted through the ear vein at 1.5 days before weaning to asses plasma insulin and IGF-1 concentrations. After estrus, all sows received a standard gestation diet until slaughter at days 42 to 43 of pregnancy. The dextrose plus starch-diets enhanced the postprandial insulin response in a dose-dependent manner (e.g. at day 2 insulin area under the curve was 4516 μU/444 min for CON, 8197 μU/444 min for INS-L and 10 894 μU/444 min for INS-H; s.e.m. = 694; P < 0.001), but did not affect plasma IGF-1 concentrations during the first 3 days of WEI. Follicle development and subsequent luteal, fetal and placental development and uniformity were not affected by the dietary treatments, nor related to plasma insulin and IGF-1 concentrations during WEI. Pre-weaning plasma insulin and IGF-1 concentrations were negatively related to sow body condition loss during lactation, but were not related to subsequent reproduction characteristics. This study shows that dietary dextrose plus starch are effective in stimulating insulin secretion (both postprandial peak and long-term concentration), but not IGF-1 secretion during the first 3 days after weaning in multiparous sows. The extreme insulin-stimulating diets during WEI did, however, not improve follicle development, or subsequent development and uniformity of fetuses and placentas in these high-prolific sows (27.0 ± 0.6 ovulations; 18.6 ± 0.6 vital fetuses).


Type
Physiology and functional biology of systems
Information
Copyright
Copyright © The Animal Consortium 2013 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Barb, CR, Kraeling, RR, Rampacek, GB, Dove, CR 1997. Metabolic changes during the transition from the fed to the acute feed-deprived state in prepuberal and mature gilts. Journal of Animal Science 75, 781789.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clowes, EJ, Aherne, FX, Foxcroft, GR 1994. Effect of delayed breeding on the endocrinology and fecundity of sows. Journal of Animal Science 72, 283291.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
CVB 2003. Dutch feeding tables. Centraal Veevoederbureau, Lelystad, The Netherlands.Google Scholar
Haber, EP, Ximenes, HMA, Procópio, J, Carvalho, CRO, Curi, R, Carpinelli, AR 2003. Pleiotropic effects of fatty acids on pancreatic β-cells. Journal of Cellular Physiology 194, 112.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hoving, LL, Soede, NM, Feitsma, H, Kemp, B 2012. Lactation weight loss in primiparous sows: consequences for embryo survival and progesterone and relations with metabolic profiles. Reproduction in Domestic Animals 47, 10091016.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Inoue, H, Watanuki, M, Myint, HT, Ito, T, Kuwayama, H, Hidari, H 2005. Effects of fasting and refeeding on plasma concentrations of leptin, ghrelin, insulin, growth hormone and metabolites in swine. Animal Science Journal 76, 367374.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 6492 1999. Animal feeding stuff – determination of fat content. International Organization for Standardization, Geneva, Switzerland.Google Scholar
ISO 6496 1999. Animal feeding stuff – determination of moisture and other volatile matter content. International Organization for Standardization, Geneva, Switzerland.Google Scholar
ISO 15914 2004. Animal feeding stuff – enzymatic determination of total starch content. International Organization for Standardization, Geneva, Switzerland.Google Scholar
ISO 5983 2005. Animal feeding stuff – determination of nitrogen content and calculation of crude protein content – part 1 Kjeldahl method. International Organization of Standardization, Geneva, Switzerland.Google Scholar
Itoh, Y, Kawamata, Y, Harada, M, Kobayashi, M, Fujii, R, Fukusumi, S, Ogi, K, Hosoya, M, Tanaka, Y, Uejima, H, Tanaka, H, Maruyama, M, Satoh, R, Okubo, S, Kizawa, H, Komatsu, H, Matsumura, F, Noguchi, Y, Shinohara, T, Hinuma, S, Fujisawa, Y, Fujino, M 2003. Free fatty acids regulate insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells through GPR40. Nature 422, 173176.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kemp, B, Soede, NM, Helmond, FA, Bosch, MW 1995. Effects of energy source in the diet on reproductive hormones and insulin during lactation and subsequent estrus in multiparous sows. Journal of Animal Science 73, 30223029.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Koopmans, SJ, Van der Meulen, J, Dekker, R, Corbijn, H, Mroz, Z 2005. Diurnal rhythms in plasma cortisol, insulin, glucose, lactate and urea in pigs fed identical meals at 12-hourly intervals. Physiology and Behavior 84, 497503.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
La Fleur, SE 2003. Daily rhythms in glucose metabolism: suprachiasmatic nucleus output to peripheral tissue. Journal of Neuroendocrinology 15, 315322.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Louveau, I, Bonneau, M 1996. Effect of a growth hormone infusion on plasma insulin-like growth factor-I in Meishan and Large White pigs. Reproduction Nutrition Development 36, 301310.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Malmlöf, K, Örberg, J, Hellberg, S, Cortova, Z, Björkgren, S 1990. The diurnal influence on utilization of dietary protein in the growing pig. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition 63, 180187.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Milligan, BN, Fraser, D, Kramer, DL 2002. Within-litter birth weight variation in the domestic pig and its relation to pre-weaning survival, weight gain, and variation in weaning weights. Livestock Production Science 76, 181191.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Quesnel, H 2009. Nutritional and lactational effects on follicular development in the pig. Control of Pig Reproduction 8, 121134.Google Scholar
Quiniou, N, Dagorn, J, Gaudré, D 2002. Variation of piglets’ birth weight and consequences on subsequent performance. Livestock Production Science 78, 6370.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rojkittikhun, T, Einarsson, S, Uvnäs-Moberg, K, Edqvist, LE 1993. Body weight loss during lactation in relation to energy and protein metabolism in standard-fed primiparous sows. Journal of Veterinary Medicine Series A 40, 249257.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Soede, N, Kemp, B 1997. Expression of oestrus and timing of ovulation in pigs. Journal of Reproduction and Fertility Supplement 52, 91103.Google ScholarPubMed
Thissen, J-P, Ketelslegers, J-M, Underwood, LE 1994. Nutritional regulation of the insulin-like growth factors. Endocrine Reviews 15, 80101.Google ScholarPubMed
Valros, A, Rundgren, M, Spinka, M, Saloniemi, H, Rydhmer, L, Hultén, F, Uvnäs-Moberg, K, Tománek, M, Krejcí, P, Algers, B 2003. Metabolic state of the sow, nursing behaviour and milk production. Livestock Production Science 79, 155167.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Van den Brand, H, Soede, NM, Kemp, B 2006. Supplementation of dextrose to the diet during the weaning to estrus interval affects subsequent variation in within-litter piglet birth weight. Animal Reproduction Science 91, 353358.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Van den Brand, H, Soede, NM, Schrama, JW, Kemp, B 1998. Effects of dietary energy source on plasma glucose and insulin concentration in gilts. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition 79, 2732.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Van den Brand, H, Dieleman, SJ, Soede, NM, Kemp, B 2000. Dietary energy source at two feeding levels during lactation of primiparous sows: I. Effects on glucose, insulin, and luteinizing hormone and on follicle development, weaning-to-estrus interval, and ovulation rate. Journal of Animal Science 78, 396404.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Van den Brand, H, Prunier, A, Soede, NM, Kemp, B 2001a. In primiparous sows, plasma insulin-like growth factor-I can be affected by lactational feed intake and dietary energy source and is associated with luteinizing hormone. Reproduction Nutrition Development 41, 2739.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Van den Brand, H, Langendijk, P, Soede, NM, Kemp, B 2001b. Effects of postweaning dietary energy source on reproductive traits in primiparous sows. Journal of Animal Science 79, 420426.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Van den Brand, H, Van Enckevort, LCM, Van der Hoeven, EM, Kemp, B 2009. Effects of dextrose plus lactose in the sows diet on subsequent reproductive performance and within litter birth weight variation. Reproduction in Domestic Animals 44, 884888.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Van Vuuren, AM, Van Der Koelen, CJ, Valk, H, De Visser, H 1993. Effects of partial replacement of ryegrass by low protein feeds on rumen fermentation and nitrogen loss by dairy cows. Journal of Dairy Science 76, 29822993.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wientjes, JGM, Soede, NM, Knol, EF, Van den Brand, H, Kemp, B 2013. Piglet birth weight and litter uniformity: effects of weaning-to-pregnancy interval and body condition changes in sows of different parities and crossbred lines. Journal of Animal Science, published online, doi: 10.2527/jas.2012-5659 (first online March 5, 2013)CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wientjes, JGM, Soede, NM, Aarsse, F, Laurenssen, BFA, Koopmanschap, RE, Van den Brand, H, Kemp, B 2012a. Effects of dietary carbohydrate sources on plasma glucose, insulin and IGF-I levels in multiparous sows. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition 96, 494505.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wientjes, JGM, Soede, NM, Van den Brand, H, Kemp, B 2012b. Nutritionally induced relationships between insulin levels during the weaning-to-ovulation interval and reproductive characteristics in multiparous sows: I. Luteinizing Hormone, Follicle Development, Oestrus and Ovulation. Reproduction in Domestic Animals 47, 5361.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wientjes, JGM, Soede, NM, Van den Brand, H, Kemp, B 2012c. Nutritionally induced relationships between insulin levels during the weaning-to-ovulation interval and reproductive characteristics in multiparous sows: II. Luteal development, progesterone and conceptus development and uniformity. Reproduction in Domestic Animals 47, 6268.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wientjes, JGM, Soede, NM, Van der Peet-Schwering, CMC, Van den Brand, H, Kemp, B 2012d. Piglet uniformity and mortality in large organic litters: effects of parity and pre-mating diet composition. Livestock Science 144, 218229.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Altmetric attention score


Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 39
Total number of PDF views: 328 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 1st December 2020. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-6d4bddd689-22s4z Total loading time: 0.83 Render date: 2020-12-01T16:07:50.748Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags last update: Tue Dec 01 2020 15:42:47 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time) Feature Flags: { "metrics": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "peerReview": true, "crossMark": true, "comments": true, "relatedCommentaries": true, "subject": true, "clr": false, "languageSwitch": true }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Insulin-stimulating diets during the weaning-to-estrus interval do not improve fetal and placental development and uniformity in high-prolific multiparous sows
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Insulin-stimulating diets during the weaning-to-estrus interval do not improve fetal and placental development and uniformity in high-prolific multiparous sows
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Insulin-stimulating diets during the weaning-to-estrus interval do not improve fetal and placental development and uniformity in high-prolific multiparous sows
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *