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Effects of zinc source and dietary concentration on serum zinc concentrations, growth performance, wool and reproductive characteristics in developing rams

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 October 2019

C. M. Page
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, University of Wyoming, Dept. 3684, 1000 East University Ave., Laramie, WY, USA
M. L. Van Emon
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, University of Wyoming, Dept. 3684, 1000 East University Ave., Laramie, WY, USA
T. W. Murphy
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, University of Wyoming, Dept. 3684, 1000 East University Ave., Laramie, WY, USA
C. K. Larson
Affiliation:
Zinpro Corporation, 10400 Viking Dr # 240, Eden Prairie, MN 55344, USA
J. G. Berardinelli
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, University of Wyoming, Dept. 3684, 1000 East University Ave., Laramie, WY, USA
I. R. McGregor
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, University of Wyoming, Dept. 3684, 1000 East University Ave., Laramie, WY, USA
J. B. Taylor
Affiliation:
United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service,Range Sheep Production Efficiency Research Unit, US Sheep Experiment Station, 19 Office Loop, Dubois, ID 83423, USA
W. C. Stewart
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, University of Wyoming, Dept. 3684, 1000 East University Ave., Laramie, WY, USA
Corresponding
E-mail address:
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Abstract

Dietary Zn has significant impacts on the growth and development of breeding rams. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of dietary Zn source and concentration on serum Zn concentration, growth performance, wool traits and reproductive performance in rams. Forty-four Targhee rams (14 months; 68 ± 18 kg BW) were used in an 84-day completely randomized design and were fed one of three pelleted dietary treatments: (1) a control without fortified Zn (CON; n = 15; ~1 × NRC); (2) a diet fortified with a Zn amino acid complex (ZnAA; n = 14; ~2 × NRC) and (3) a diet fortified with ZnSO4 (ZnSO4; n = 15; ~2 × NRC). Growth and wool characteristics measured throughout the course of the study were BW, average daily gain (ADG), dry matter intake (DMI), feed efficiency (G : F), longissimus dorsi muscle depth (LMD), back fat (BF), wool staple length (SL) and average fibre diameter (AFD). Blood was collected from each ram at four time periods to quantify serum Zn and testosterone concentrations. Semen was collected 1 to 2 days after the trial was completed. There were no differences in BW (P = 0.45), DMI (P = 0.18), LMD (P = 0.48), BF (P = 0.47) and AFD (P = 0.9) among treatment groups. ZnSO4 had greater (P ≤ 0.03) serum Zn concentrations compared with ZnAA and CON treatments. Rams consuming ZnAA had greater (P ≤ 0.03) ADG than ZnSO4 and CON. There tended to be differences among groups for G : F (P = 0.06), with ZnAA being numerically greater than ZnSO4 and CON. Wool staple length regrowth was greater (P < 0.001) in ZnSO4 and tended to be longer (P = 0.06) in ZnAA treatment group compared with CON. No differences were observed among treatments in scrotal circumference, testosterone, spermatozoa concentration within ram semen, % motility, % live sperm and % sperm abnormalities (P ≥ 0.23). Results indicated beneficial effects of feeding increased Zn concentrations to developing Targhee rams, although Zn source elicited differential responses in performance characteristics measured.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© The Animal Consortium 2019

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Footnotes

a

Present address: USDA, ARS, Genetics, Breeding, and Animal Health Research Unit, US Meat Animal Research Center, Clay Center, NE 68933, USA

b

Present address: Department of Animal and Rangeland Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA

*

Mention of trade names or commercial products in this publication is solely for the purpose of providing specific information and does not imply recommendation or endorsement by the US Department of Agriculture. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, colour, national origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex, marital status, familial status, parental status, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, political beliefs, reprisal, or because all or part of an individual’s income is derived from any public assistance program. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA’s TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20250-9410, or call (800) 795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720-6382 (TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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