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Region, Nation, and Social Science: An Interview with Joseph L. Love on 50 Years of Studying Brazil

  • Zephyr Frank (a1), Glen Goodman (a2) and James Woodard (a3)

Extract

In late September 2016, the Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) hosted a symposium on regionalism in Brazilian history to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of Professor Joseph L. Love's arrival at Illinois. Organized by the Institute's director, Professor Jerry Dávila, the symposium brought together historians from the United States and Brazil for a day-long discussion of an issue that continues to attract scholarly attention in both countries. Love himself contributed to the study of Brazilian regionalism with two landmark studies: Rio Grande do Sul and Brazilian Regionalism, 1882–1930 (1971) and São Paulo in the Brazilian Federation, 1889–1937 (1980). The latter was produced alongside John Wirth's Minas Gerais in the Brazilian Federation, 1889–1937 (1977) and Robert Levine's Pernambuco in the Brazilian Federation, 1889–1937 (1978) as part of a larger project conceived and carried out through a decade's worth of unprecedentedly close collaboration. At Illinois, Love inspired hundreds of undergraduates with his award-winning teaching and trained a bi-national cohort of graduate students who have gone on to careers of great distinction in Brazil and in the United States.

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In addition to the interview questions reported below, other questions were addressed electronically over the months that followed. Transcripts of these exchanges were then condensed and edited for readability, eliminating redundancies and making for clarity on the page in cases where what was apparent in conversation was less so in transcription. Because the interview was a collective effort, no one person's name is attached to the questions addressed in this interview.

Footnotes

References

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1. Love, Joseph L., Rio Grande do Sul and Brazilian Regionalism, 1882–1930 (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1971) and São Paulo in the Brazilian Federation, 1889–1937 (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1980); John D. Wirth, Minas Gerais in the Brazilian Federation, 1889–1937 (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1977); Robert M. Levine, Pernambuco in the Brazilian Federation, 1889–1937 (1978).

2. Zephyr Lake Frank, “The Brazilian Far West: Frontier Development in Mato Grosso, 1870–1937” (PhD diss.: University of Illinois, 1999); Goodman, Glen, “The Enduring Politics of German-Brazilian Ethnicity,” German History 33:3 (2015): 423438; James P. Woodard, A Place in Politics: São Paulo, Brazil, from Seigneurial Republicanism to Regionalist Revolt (Durham: Duke University Press, 2009).

3. Love, Joseph L., The Revolt of the Whip (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2012). Recent scholarly works dealing with the Brazilian naval mutiny of 1910 include Alvaro Pereira do Nascimento, Cidadania, cor e disciplina na revolta dos marinheiros de 1910 (Rio de Janeiro: Mauad, 2008); Silvia Capanema Pereira de Almeida, “Nous, marins, citoyens brésiliens et républicains: identités, modernité et mémoire de la révolte des matelots de 1910” (Doctoral thesis: École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, 2010); and Morgan, Zachary R., Legacy of the Lash: Race and Corporal Punishment in the Brazilian Navy and the Atlantic World (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2014). The subsequent revolt by sailors and naval troops, customarily seen as a sequel to the mutiny, is investigated on its own in Henrique Samet, A revolta do Batalhão Naval (Rio de Janeiro: Garamond, 2011).

4. Love, Joseph L., “Economic Ideas and Ideologies in Latin America since 1930,” in The Cambridge History of Latin America, Bethell, Leslie, ed., vol. 6, 1930 to the Present, Part 1: Economy and Society (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995), 393460.

5. McGann, See Thomas F., Argentina, the United States, and the Inter-American system, 1880–1914 (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1957).

6. The Hispanic American Report's first story on the planned invasion was published in its volume 13 in November 1960 (583). Ronald Hilton's account of this episode is available at http://wais.stanford.edu/Cuba/cuba_bayofpigs.html, accessed October 31, 2017.

7. Schumpeter, Joseph A., Capitalism, Socialism, Democracy (New York: Harper and Brothers, 1942); Friedrich, Carl J. and Brzezinski, Zbigniew K., Totalitarian Dictatorship and Autocracy (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1956).

8. Linz, Juan J., “The Perils of Presidentialism,” Journal of Democracy 1:1 (Winter 1990): 5169.

9. Linz, Juan J. and Miguel, Armando de, “Within-Nation Differences and Comparisons: The Eight Spains,” in Comparing Nations: The Use of Quantitative Data in Cross-National Research, Merritt, Richard L. and Rokkan, Stein, eds. (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1966), 267319.

10. Assis, Machado de, Epitaph of a Small Winner, William L. Grossman, trans. (New York: Noonday Press, 1952).

11. Faoro, Raymundo, Os donos do poder (Porto Alegre: Editora Globo, 1958).

12. Styron, William, The Confessions of Nat Turner (New York: Random House, 1967).

13. Érico Veríssimo, O tempo e o vento, vol. 3 (Porto Alegre: Editoria Globo, 1961); Amado, Gilberto, Depois da política (Rio de Janeiro: José Olympio, 1960).

14. Marieta de Moraes Ferreira, ed., A Republica na Velha Provincia: oligarquias e crise no estado do Rio de Janeiro (Rio de Janeiro: Rio Fundo, 1989).

15. Kátia M de Queirós Mattoso, Bahia, século XIX: uma província no império (Rio de Janeiro: Nova Fronteira, 1992).

16. Pang, Eul-Soo, Bahia in the First Brazilian Republic: Coronelismo and Oligarchies, 1889–1934 (Gainesville: Florida University Press, 1979); Lewin, Linda, Politics and Parentela in Paraíba: A Case Study of Family-Based Oligarchy in Brazil (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1987).

17. Weinstein, Barbara, The Color of Modernity: São Paulo and the Making of Race and Nation in Brazil (Durham: Duke University Press, 2015).

18. Love, Joseph L., “Modeling Internal Colonialism: History and Prospect,” World Development 17:6 (June 1989): 905922.

19. Alfred Sauvy, “Trois mondes, une planète,” L'Observateur, August 14, 1952.

20. Love, Joseph L., Crafting the Third World: Theorizing Underdevelopment in Rumania and Brazil (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1996).

21. Love, Joseph L., “Third World: A Response to Prof. Worsley,” Third World Quarterly 2:2 (April 1980): 315317; Cullather, Nick, “Development? It's History,” Diplomatic History 24:2 (Fall 2000): 641653.

22. Justino, David, Fontismo: liberalismo numa sociedade illiberal (Alfragide, Portugal: Dom Quixote, 2016).

23. Joseph L. Love, “CEPAL, Economic Development, and Inequality,” in The Political Economy of Development Economics: A Historical Perspective, Michele Alacevich and Mauro Boianovsky, eds., annual supplement to History of Political Economy, vol. 50 (2018).

24. Edmar Morel, A Revolta da Chibata (Rio de Janeiro: Pongetti, 1959).

25. Hélio Leôncio Martins, A revolta dos marinheiros, 1910 (Rio de Janeiro: Serviço de Documentação Geral da Marinha, 1988).

26. Silvia Capanema Pereira de Almeida, “Nous, marins, citoyens brésiliens et républicains”; Nascimento, Cidadania, cor e disciplina; Morgan, Legacy of the Lash; Jose Miguel Arias Neto, “Em busca da cidadania: praças da Armada Nacional 1867–1910” (PhD diss.: Universidade de São Paulo, 2001).

27. Sombart, Werner, Der Moderne Kapitalismus, vol. 2 (Leipzig: Duncker & Humboldt, 1927).

In addition to the interview questions reported below, other questions were addressed electronically over the months that followed. Transcripts of these exchanges were then condensed and edited for readability, eliminating redundancies and making for clarity on the page in cases where what was apparent in conversation was less so in transcription. Because the interview was a collective effort, no one person's name is attached to the questions addressed in this interview.

Region, Nation, and Social Science: An Interview with Joseph L. Love on 50 Years of Studying Brazil

  • Zephyr Frank (a1), Glen Goodman (a2) and James Woodard (a3)

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