Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

The Acceptance and Persistence of Ring Vessels and Stirrup Spout-Handles in the Southwest

  • Keith A. Dixon (a1)

Abstract

The ring vessel (or “doughnut jar”) and the stirrup spout-handle concepts probably diffused together, not only from Peru to Mesoamerica during the pre-Classic, but also from Mesoamerica to the southwestern and eastern United States. In the Southwest they first appeared in the San Juan area around A.D. 500; later they were accepted by other Anasazi and Anasazi-influenced cultures and persisted to the historic period. The apparent interest of the early Anasazi in odd vessel shapes may account for the acceptance of these two shape concepts by the Anasazi rather than by the Hohokam or Mogollon. The ring vessels and stirrup tubes may have continued into the historic period because, unlike most of the other odd forms, these had come to be traditional in certain persisting ceremonial contexts. However, before these suggestions can be adequately evaluated, more information from the Southwest is needed, and the meanings and associations of the two forms in Mesoamerica must be analyzed.

Copyright

References

Hide All
Brainerd, G. W. 1949 A Stirrup Pot from Lower California. Masterkey, Vol. 23, No. 1, pp. 58. Los Angeles.
Dixon, K. A. 1959 Two Carved Human Bones from Chiapas. Archaeology, Vol. 12, No. 2, pp. 106–10. New York.
Fewkes, J. W. 1898 Archaeological Expedition to Arizona in 1895. Seventeenth Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology, Pt. II. Washington.
Fewkes, J. W. 1904 Two Summers' Work in Pueblo Ruins. Twenty-second Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology, Pt. I, pp. 3-195. Washington.
Fewkes, J. W. 1909 Prehistoric Ruins of the Gila Valley. Smithsonian Institution Miscellaneous Collections, Vol. 52, pp. 403–36. Washington.
Fewkes, J. W. 1918 A Unique Form of Prehistoric Pottery. Journal of the Washington Academy of Sciences, Vol. 8, No. 18, pp. 598601. Baltimore.
Gladwin, H. S., Haury, E. W., Sayles, E. B., and Gladwin, N. 1937 Excavations at Snaketown, Material Culture. Medallion Papers, No. 25. Globe.
Hodge, F. W. 1923 Circular Kivas near Hawikuh, New Mexico. Museum of the American. Indian, Heye Foundation, Contributions, Vol. 7, No. 1. New York.
Jeançon, J. A. 1923 Excavations in the Chama Valley, New Mexico. Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 81. Washington.
Jeançon, J. A. and Roberts, F. H. H. Jr. 1923-24 Further Archaeological Research in the Northeastern San Juan Basin of Colorado, During the Summer of 1922. Colorado Magazine, Vol. 1, Nos. 1-7, pp. 10-36, 65-70, 108-18, 163- 73, 213-24, 260-76, 301-07. Denver.
Judd, N. M. 1954 The Material Culture of Pueblo Bonito. Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, Vol. 124. Washington.
Kidder, A. V. 1915 Pottery of the Pajarito Plateau and of Some Adjacent Regions in New Mexico. Memoirs of the American Anthropological Association, Vol. 2, No. 6. Lancaster.
Kidder, A. V. and Shepard, A. O. 1936 The Pottery of Pecos, Volume II, Glaze-Paint, Culinary, and Other Wares. Phillips Academy Southwestern Expedition Papers, No. 7. Yale University Press, New Haven.
Martin, P. S. and Rinaldo, J. B. 1947 The SU Site, Excavations at a Mogollon Village, Western New Mexico, Third Season, 1946. Chicago Natural History Museum Anthropological Series, Vol. 32, No. 3. Chicago.
Martin, P. S. and Willis, E. S. 1940 Anasazi Painted Pottery in the Field Museum of Natural History. Chicago Natural History Museum, Anthropological Memoirs, No. 5. Chicago.
Morris, E. H. 1919 Preliminary Account of the Antiquities of the Region Between the Mancos and La Plata Rivers in Southwestern Colorado. Thirty-third Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology, pp. 155-206. Washington.
Morris, E. H. 1927 The Beginnings of Pottery Making in the San Juan Area; Unfired Prototypes and the Wares of the Earliest Ceramic Period. Anthropological Papers of the American Museum of Natural History, Vol. 28, No. 2. New York.
Morris, E. H. 1939 Archaeological Studies in the La Plata District, Southwestern Colorado and Northwestern New Mexico. Carnegie Institution of Washington, Publication 519. Washington.
Parsons, L. A. 1963 A Doughnut-Shaped Vessel from Kaminaljuyii, with a Distributional Analysis of this Unusual Form. American Antiquity, Vol. 28, No. 3, pp. 386–9. Salt Lake City.
Roberts, F. H. H. Jr. 1932 The Village of the Great Kivas on the Zuni Reservation. Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 111. Washington.
Roberts, F. H. H. Jr. 1940 Archaeological Remains in the Whitewater District, Eastern Arizona; Part II: Artifacts and Burials. Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 126. Washington.
Stevenson, J. 1883a Illustrated Catalogue of the Collections Obtained from the Indians of New Mexico and Arizona in 1879. Second Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology, pp. 307-422. Washington.
Stevenson, J. 1883b Illustrated Catalogue of the Collections Obtained from the Indians of New Mexico in 1880. Second Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology, pp. 423-65. Washington.
Wendorf, F., Assembler 1953 Salvage Archaeology in the Chama Valley, New Mexico. School of American Research Monographs 17. Santa Fe.

The Acceptance and Persistence of Ring Vessels and Stirrup Spout-Handles in the Southwest

  • Keith A. Dixon (a1)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.