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California’s Red Abalone (Haliotis Rufescens) Middens: Comment on Glassow

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Todd J. Braje*
Affiliation:
San Diego State University, Department of Anthropology, San Diego, CA 92182-6040
Jon M. Erlandson*
Affiliation:
Museum of Natural and Cultural History, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403-1224

Abstract

Glassow’s (2015) synthesis of “red abalone middens” on California’s Santa Cruz Island does not include the broader geographic, chronologic, and ecological context to this phenomenon. We explore the wider distribution of these site types and emphasize their importance for addressing modern fisheries management issues.

La síntesis de Glassow (2015) sobre “los sitios de abulón rojo” en la Isla de Santa Cruz en California no incluye el contexto geográfico, cronológico y ecológico más amplio de este fenómeno. Nosotros exploramos la distribución más extensa de este tipo de sitios y enfatizamos su importancia para abordar problemas en la administración de pescaderías modernas.

Type
Comments
Copyright
Copyright © Society for American Archaeology 2016

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References

Braje, Todd J., Erlandson, Jon M., and Rick, Torben C. 2013 Red Abalone, Sea Otters, and Kelp Forest Ecosystems on Historic Period San Miguel Island, California. In Historical Ecology and Marine Resource Use in the Indo- Pacific Regions, edited by Ono, Rintaro, Morrison, Alex, and Addison, David, pp. 8596. Australian National University, Canberra.Google Scholar
Braje, Todd J., Erlandson, Jon M., Rick, Torben C., Dayton, Paul K., and Hatch, Marco B. A. 2009 Fishing from Past to Present: Continuity and Resilience of Red Abalone Fisheries on the Channel Islands. Ecological Applications 19: 906919.Google Scholar
Braje, Todd J., Rick, Torben C., and Erlandson, Jon M. 2012 A Trans-Holocene Historical Ecological Record of Shellfish Harvesting on California's Northern Channel Islands. Quaternary International 264: 109120.Google Scholar
Erlandson, Jon M., Rick, Torben C., Michael Graham, James Estes, Todd Braje, and René Vellanoweth 2005 Sea Otters, Shellfish, and Humans: 10,000 Years of Ecological Interaction on San Miguel Island, California. Proceedings of the Sixth California Islands Symposium, edited by Garcelon, David K. and Schwimm, Catherin A., pp. 58–69. Institute for Wildlife Studies and National Park Service, Arcata.Google Scholar
Erlandson, Jon M., Rick, Torben C., Braje, Todd J., Casperson, Molly, Culleton, Brendan, Fulfrost, Brian, Garcia, Tracy, Guthrie, Daniel, Jew, Nicholas, Kennett, Douglas, Moss, Madonna L., Reeder, Leslie, Skinner, Craig, Watts, Jack, and Willis, Lauren 2011 Paleoindian Seafaring, Maritime Technologies, and Coastal Foraging on California's Channel Islands. Science 441: 11811185.Google Scholar
Glassow, Michael A. 2015 Chronology of Red Abalone Middens on Santa Cruz Island, California, and Evidence for Subsistence and Settlement Change. American Antiquity 80:745–759. Joslin, Terry 2010 Middle and Late Holocene Hunter-Gatherer Adaptations to Coastal Ecosystems along the Southern San Simeon Reef, California. Ph.D. dissertation, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Santa Barbara.Google Scholar
Vellanoweth, René; L., and Erlandson, Jon M. 1999 Middle Holocene Fishing and Maritime Adaptations at CA-SNI-161, San Nicolas Island, California. Journal of California and Great Basin Anthropology 21: 257 274.Google Scholar
Whitaker, Adrian R., and Byrd, Brian F. 2012 Boat-Based Foraging and Discontinuous Prehistoric Red Abalone Exploitation along the California Coast. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology 31: 196214. Google Scholar

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