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  • Print publication year: 2004
  • Online publication date: August 2009

1 - Introduction

Summary

The middle ages of women are an often forgotten time and the women are often overlooked in healthcare. Regularly, healthcare providers address only the women's hormonal needs and minimize discussion of their health and wellbeing. The opportunities for improvement for future health are immense. Women can make lifestyle changes that will profoundly affect their future health, comfort, and length of life. Treatment of hypertension and diabetes is believed to improve mortality and morbidity. Health promotion and disease prevention are possible if each woman is considered an individual and her health needs addressed personally. The medical variation in women this age is tremendous. Most women enter this age group in good health, but chronic health conditions often intrude. Changes or modifications to their healthcare, changes that are possible working collaboratively between woman and physician, will have profound effects on the way they meet their later years.
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