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Appendix A

from Chapter 1 - Is 40 the New 30? Increasing Reproductive Intentions and Fertility Rates beyond Age 40

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 September 2022

Dimitrios S. Nikolaou
Affiliation:
Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London
David B. Seifer
Affiliation:
Yale Reproductive Medicine, New Haven, CT
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

Appendix A

Figure A1.1 Cumulative fertility rates at ages 40+ by birth order, selected European countries, 1980–2018.

Source: Computations based on Human Fertility Database [42]: data on period and cohort fertility rates by age and birth order, period fertility tables by age and parity.

Figure A1.2 Share of women aged 40–44 who intend to have a child, by year and parity, selected European countries, 2005–11.

Source: Generations and Gender Surveys [Reference Settersten and Hägestag58], first wave collected between 2005 and 2011 depending on the country.Note: Figure displays 95% confidence intervals, results are weighted with survey weights.

Figure A1.3 Share of women aged 35–44 with no or one child who intend to have a child, by level of education; selected countries in Europe.

Source and notes: see Figure A1.2. Low education corresponds to ISCED 0–2, medium education to ISCED 3–4, and high education to ISCED 5–6 in the International Standard Classification of Education 1997.

Figure A1.4 Live births per IVF treatment by age and share of live births following in vitro fertilisation by age, United Kingdom, 2018.

Source: Computations based on IVF data published by HFEA [68] and data on live births by age in the Human Fertility database (2021).

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