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  • Print publication year: 2004
  • Online publication date: June 2018

Medicine

from MEDICINE

Summary

Introductions to the subject

Biomedical platforms: realigning the normal and the pathological in late-twentieth-century medicine

P. Keating and A. Cambrosio MIT Press, 2003, 544pp. $55.00. ISBN 0262112760.

Interesting sociologically-based review of the coming together of biological and medical approaches to form ‘biomedicine’. Useful offset to dichotomies underpinning science/technology, basic/applied, as well as biology/medicine itself. Notes and references pp 341–525.

Calculus for biology and medicine

C. Neuhauser See entry no. 1896

Dicing with death: chance, risk and health

S. Senn Cambridge University Press, 2003, 251pp. £14.99. ISBN 0521540232.

Explanation of how statistics determines many decisions about medical care, from allocating resources for health, to determining which drugs to license, to cause-and-effect in relation to disease.

‘[a] remarkable achievement … In a slim paperback that is best read cover to cover. Stephen Senn has attempted to do for medical statistics what Stephen Hawking did for physics in A Brief History of Time … And Simon Singh did for pure mathematics in Fermat's Last Theorem. I think he has succeeded.’ (British Medical Journal)

  • Medical statistics from A to Z: a guide for clinicians and medical students B.S. Everitt Cambridge University Press, 2003, 230pp. £20.99. ISBN 0521532043. Aims to provide non-technical definitions; with most entries having background reading which – where possible – involves ‘medical rather than statistical journals and introductory statistical texts rather than those that are more advanced’.
  • Essential medical statistics

    B.R. Kirkwood and J.A.C. Sterne 2nd edn, Blackwell Science, 2003, 501pp. £22.95. ISBN 0865428719.

    Successfully builds on the strength of the 1st edn by ‘keeping the emphasis on enabling the reader to know which method to apply when’. Responds to growth in use of ITbased techniques by covering methods formerly considered too advanced for an introductory text. Very well written and laid-out.

    ‘the breadth of coverage of the book is excellent … a rather different approach to teaching medical statistics.’ (Statistics in Medicine)

    ‘This book is statistically correct. That is enough to distinguish it from most of its competitors.’ (British Medical Journal)

  • The Cambridge dictionary of statistics in the medical sciences B.S. Everitt Cambridge University Press, 1995, 274pp. £20.99. ISBN 0521479282. 2000 simple definitions and explanations of statistical concepts, especially those used in biomedicine.
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