Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
The New Cambridge Companion to Herman Melville
  • Export citation
  • Recommend to librarian
  • Buy the print book

Book description

The New Cambridge Companion to Herman Melville provides timely, critical essays on Melville's classic works. The essays have been specially commissioned for this volume and provide a complete overview of Melville's career. Melville's major novels are discussed, along with a range of his short fiction and poetry, including neglected works ripe for rediscovery. The volume includes essays on such new topics as Melville and oceanic studies, Melville and animal studies, and Melville and the planetary, along with a number of essays that focus on form and aesthetics. Written at a level both challenging and accessible, this New Companion brings together a team of leading international scholars to offer students of American literature the most comprehensive introduction available to Melville's art.

Refine List

Actions for selected content:

Select all | Deselect all
  • View selected items
  • Export citations
  • Download PDF (zip)
  • Send to Kindle
  • Send to Dropbox
  • Send to Google Drive

Save Search

You can save your searches here and later view and run them again in "My saved searches".

Please provide a title, maximum of 40 characters.
×

Contents

Selected Bibliography

Critical studies of Melville’s works are numerous. This bibliography emphasizes book-length studies published in the last twenty years, though seminal early works and a sampling of provocative recent articles are also included.

I. Melville’s Writings

The Northwestern-Newberry Edition (N-N) of The Writings of Herman Melville (Evanston and Chicago, IL: Northwestern University Press and The Newberry Library, 1968– ), edited by Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle, is standard and nearly complete. For an annotated edition that has had a significant influence on Melville studies, see also the Hendricks House series The Complete Works of Herman Melville (New York, 1947–). Other important editions include Robert Charles Ryan, ed., Weeds and Wildings Chiefly: With a Rose or Two (Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 1967); Douglass Robillard, ed., The Poems of Herman Melville (Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 2000); and John Bryant and Haskell Springer, eds., Moby-Dick: A Longman Critical Edition (New York: Pearson, 2007). In the following list of the most widely used scholarly editions, the first publication date is provided parenthetically. Also noted parenthetically, where appropriate, are titles of the first British publications.

Billy Budd, Sailor (An Inside Narrative). Ed. Harrison Hayford and Merton M. Sealts, Jr. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1962.
Clarel: A Poem and Pilgrimage in the Holy Land (1876). Ed. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle. N-N, 1991.
The Confidence-Man: His Masquerade (1857). Ed. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle. N-N, 1984.
Correspondence. Ed. Lynn Horth. N-N, 1993.
Israel Potter: His Fifty Years of Exile (1855). Ed. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle. N-N, 1982.
Journals. Ed. Howard C. Horsford and Lynn Horth. N-N, 1989.
Mardi and a Voyage Thither (1849). Ed. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle. N-N, 1970.
Melville’s Marginalia. Ed. Walker Cowan. 2 volumes. New York: Garland, 1987.
Moby-Dick; or, The Whale (1851; The Whale). Ed. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle. N-N, 1988.
Omoo: A Narrative of Adventures in the South Seas (1847). Ed. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle. N-N, 1968.
The Piazza Tales and Other Prose Pieces, 1839–1860 [Includes The Piazza Tales, 1856]. Ed. Harrison Hayford, Alma A. MacDougall, and G. Thomas Tanselle. N-N, 1987.
Pierre; or, The Ambiguities (1852). Ed. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle. N-N, 1971.
Published Poems: Battle-Pieces [1866], John Marr [1888],Timoleon [1891]. Ed. Robert C. Ryan, Harrison Hayford, Alma MacDougall Reising, and G. Thomas Tanselle. N-N, 2009.
Redburn: His First Voyage, Being the Sailor-boy Confessions and Reminiscences of the Son-of-a-Gentleman, in the Merchant Service (1849). Ed. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle. N-N, 1969.
Typee: A Peep at Polynesian Life (1846; Narrative of a Four Months’ Residence among the Natives of a Valley of the Marquesas Islands). Ed. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle. N-N, 1968.
White-Jacket: or, The World in a Man-of-War (1850). Ed. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle. N-N, 1970.

II. Biographical Studies and Resources

Important archival material may be found in the Melville Family Papers, Gansevoort-Lansing Collection, The New York Public Library, New York City; and at The Houghton Library of Harvard University. Other Melville repositories include The Newberry Library, The Berkshire Athenaeum, and the Clifton Waller Barrett Library at the University of Virginia. Parker’s two-volume biography has the facts and more; Andrew Delbanco’s relatively compact biography may be the best life for the general reader.

Delbanco, Andrew. Melville: His World and Work. New York: Knopf, 2005.
Dillingham, William B.Melville and His Circle: The Last Years. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1997.
Garner, Stanton. The Civil War World of Herman Melville. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1993.
Gilman, William H.Melville’s Early Life and Redburn. New York: New York University Press, 1951.
Heflin, Wilson. Herman Melville’s Whaling Years. Ed. Mary K. Bercaw Edwards and Thomas Farel Heffernan. Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Press, 2004.
Leyda, Jay, ed. The Melville Log: A Documentary Life of Herman Melville, 1819–1891. 1951. 2 vols. Reprint with supplement. New York: Gordian Press, 1969.
Metcalf, Eleanor. Herman Melville: Cycle and Epicycle. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1953.
Miller, Edwin Haviland. Herman Melville: A Biography. New York: Braziller, 1975.
Parker, Hershel, Herman Melville: A Biography. 2 vols. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996 and 2002.
Robertson-Lorant, Laurie. Melville: A Biography. New York: Clarkson Potter, 1996.
Rogin, Michael Paul. Subversive Genealogy: The Politics and Art of Herman Melville. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1983.
Sealts, Merton M., Jr. The Early Lives of Melville: Nineteenth-Century Biographical Sketches and Their Authors. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1974.
Sealts, Merton M.. Melville as Lecturer. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1957.

III. Critical Reception and Bibliography

In addition to the following texts, useful information on critical reception and bibliography can be found in the Melville chapter in American Literary Scholarship: An Annual (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1963– ), Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies (published three times a year), the annual MLA Bibliography, and the bibliographic discussions in the Northwestern-Newberry Edition.

Hayes, Kevin J., ed. The Critical Response to Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1994.
Higgins, Brian. Herman Melville: An Annotated Bibliography, 1846–1930. Boston: G. K. Hall, 1979.
Higgins, BrianHerman Melville: A Reference Guide, 1931–1960. Boston, MA: G. K. Hall, 1987.
Higgins, Brian, and Hershel Parker, ed. Herman Melville: The Contemporary Reviews. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995.
Lee, A. Robert, ed. Herman Melville: Critical Assessments. 4 vols. Mountfield, East Sussex: Helm Information, 2001.
Yothers, Brian. Melville’s Mirrors: Literary Criticism and America’s Most Elusive Author. Rochester, New York: Camden House, 2011.

IV. Source Studies

Bercaw, Mary K.Melville’s Sources. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 1987.
Coffler, Gail H.Melville’s Allusions to Religion: A Comprehensive Index and Glossary. Westport, CT: Praeger, 2004.
Coffler, Gail H.Melville’s Classical Allusions: A Comprehensive Index and Glossary. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1985.
Grey, Robin, ed. Melville and Milton: An Edition and Analysis of Melville’s Annotations on Milton. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2004.
Sealts, Merton M., Jr. Melville’s Reading. Revised and enlarged edition. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1988.
Wright, Nathalia. Melville’s Use of the Bible. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1949.

V. Collections of Critical Essays

Argersinger, Jana L., and Leland S. Person, eds. Hawthorne and Melville: Writing a Relationship. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2008.
Barnum, Jill, Wyn Kelley, and Christopher Sten, eds. “Whole Oceans Away”: Melville and the Pacific. Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 2007.
Brodhead, Richard, ed. New Essays on Moby-Dick. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986.
Bryant, John, ed. A Companion to Melville Studies. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1986.
Bryant, John, Mary K. Bercaw Edwards, and Timothy Marr, eds. Ungraspable Phantom: Essays on Moby-Dick. Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 2006.
Bryant, John and Robert Milder, eds. Melville’s Evermoving Dawn: Centennial Essays. Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 1997.
Burkholder, Robert, ed. Critical Essays on Herman Melville’s “Benito Cereno.New York: G. K. Hall, 1992.
Frank, Jason. A Political Companion to Herman Melville. Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 2013.
Gunn, Giles, ed. A Historical Guide to Herman Melville. New York: Oxford University Press, 2005.
Higgins, Brian, and Hershel Parker, eds. Critical Essays on Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick. New York: G. K. Hall, 1992.
Jehlen, Myra, ed. Herman Melville: A Collection of Critical Essays. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1994.
Kelley, Wyn, ed. A Companion to Herman Melville. Oxford: Blackwell, 2006.
Jędrzejko, Pawel et al., eds. Secret Sharers: Melville, Conrad and Narratives of the Real. Zabrze (Poland): M-Studio, 2011.
Levine, Robert S., ed. The Cambridge Companion to Herman Melville. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.
Levine, Robert S., and Samuel Otter, eds. Frederick Douglass and Herman Melville: Essays in Relation. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2008.
Marovitz, Sanford E. and A. C. Christodoulou, eds. Melville among the Nations. Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 2001.
Otter, Samuel, and Geoffrey Sanborn, eds. Melville and Aesthetics. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
Parker, Hershel, and Harrison Hayford, eds. Moby-Dick as Doubloon: Essays and Extracts (1851–1970). New York: Norton, 1970.
Schultz, Elizabeth, and Haskell Springer, eds. Melville and Women. Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 2006.
Sten, Christopher, ed. Savage Eye: Melville and the Visual Arts. Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 1991.
Yannella, Donald, ed. New Essays on Billy Budd. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.

VI. Studies of Melville

Adler, Joyce. War in Melville’s Imagination. New York: New York University Press, 1981.
Arsić, Branka. Passive Constitutions or 7½ Times Bartleby. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2007.
Baym, Nina. “Melville’s Quarrel with Fiction,” PMLA 94 (1979): 90323.
Bellis, Peter. No Mysteries Out of Ourselves: Identity and Textual Form in the Novels of Herman Melville. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1990.
Berthoff, Warner. The Example of Melville. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1962.
Berthold, Dennis. American Risorgimento: Herman Melville and the Cultural Politics of Italy. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 2009.
Brodtkorb, Paul Jr. Ishmael’s White World: A Phenomenological Reading of Moby-Dick. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1965.
Bryant, John. Melville and Repose: The Rhetoric of Humor in the American Renaissance. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993.
Bryant, JohnMelville Unfolding: Sexuality, Politics, and the Versions of Typee: A Fluid-text Analysis. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2008.
Buell, Lawrence. “The Unkillable Dream of the Great American Novel: Moby-Dick as Test Case.” American Literary History 20 (2008): 13255.
Chase, Richard. Herman Melville: A Critical Study. New York: Macmillan, 1949.
Colatrella, Carol.Literature and Moral Reform: Melville and the Discipline of Reading. Gainesville: University of Florida Press, 2002.
Cook, Jonathan A.Inscrutable Malice: Theodicy, Eschatology, and the Biblical Sources of Moby-Dick. DeKalb: University of Illinois Press, 2012.
Cotkin, George. Dive Deeper: Journeys with Moby-Dick. New York: Oxford University Press, 2012.
Creech, James. Closet Writing / Gay Reading: The Case of Melville’s Pierre. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1993.
DeLombard, Jeannine Marie. “Salvaging Legal Personhood: Melville’s ‘Benito Cereno.’” American Literature 81 (2009): 3564.
Dillingham, William B.Melville’s Later Novels. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1986.
Dimock, Wai-chee. Empire for Liberty: Melville and the Poetics of Individualism. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1989.
Dowling, David. Chasing the White Whale: The Moby-Dick Marathon; or, What Melville Means Today. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2010.
Dryden, Edgar A.Melville’s Thematics of Form: The Great Art of Telling the Truth. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1968.
Dryden, Edgar A.Monumental Melville: The Formation of a Literary Career. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2004.
Duban, James. Melville’s Major Fiction: Politics, Theology, and Imagination. DeKalb: University of Illinois Press, 1983.
Evans, K. L.Whale!Minneapolis: University of Minneapolis Press, 2003.
Evelev, John. Tolerable Entertainment: Herman Melville and Professionalism in Antebellum New York. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2006.
Fisher, Marvin. Going Under: Melville’s Short Fiction and the American 1850s. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1977.
Franklin, H. Bruce.The Wake of the Gods: Melville’s Mythology. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1963.
Freeburg, Christopher. Melville and the Idea of Blackness: Race and Imperialism in Nineteenth-Century America. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012.
Hayford, Harrison. Melville’s Prisoners. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2003.
Herbert, T. Walter. Marquesan Encounters: Melville and the Meaning of Civilization. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1980.
Herbert, T. WalterMoby-Dick and Calvinism: A World Dismantled. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1977.
Higgins, Brian and Hershel Parker. Reading Melville’s Pierre; or, The Ambiguities. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2006.
James, C. L. R.Mariners, Renegades and Castaways: The Story of Herman Melville and the World We Live In.1953. Introduction, Donald E. Pease. Hanover, NH: University Press of New England, 2001.
Karcher, Carolyn. Shadow over the Promised Land: Slavery, Race, and Violence in Melville’s America. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1980.
Kelley, Wyn. Herman Melville: An Introduction. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2008.
Kelley, WynMelville’s City: Urban and Literary Form in Nineteenth-Century New York. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press, 1996.
Markels, Julian. Melville and the Politics of Identity: From King Learto Moby-Dick. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1993.
Marrs, Cody. “A Wayward Art: Battle-Pieces and Melville’s Poetic Turn.” American Literature 82 (2010): 91119.
Martin, Robert K.Hero, Captain, and Stranger: Male Friendship, Social Critique, and Literary Form in the Sea Novels of Herman Melville. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1986.
McCall, Dan. The Silence of Bartleby. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1989.
Milder, Robert. Exiled Royalties: Melville and the Life We Imagine. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.
Olson, Charles. Call Me Ishmael: A Study of Melville. San Francisco, CA: City Lights Books, 1947.
Otter, Samuel. Melville’s Anatomies. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999.
Pardes, Ilana. Melville’s Bibles. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2008.
Parker, Hershel. Reading Billy Budd. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 1990.
Parker, HershelMelville: The Making of the Poet. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2008.
Parker, HershelMelville Biography: An Inside Narrative. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2013.
Peretz, Eyal. Literature, Disaster, and the Enigma of Power: A Reading of Moby-Dick. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2003.
Philbrick, Nathaniel. Why Read Moby-Dick?New York: Viking, 2011.
Post-Lauria, Sheila. Correspondent Colorings: Melville in the Marketplace. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1996.
Potter, William. Melville’s Clarel and the Intersympathy of Creeds. Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 2004.
Renker, Elizabeth. Strike through the Mask: Herman Melville and the Scene of Writing. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996.
Robillard, Douglas. Melville and the Visual Arts: Ionian Form, Venetian Tint. Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 1997.
Samson, John. White Lies: Melville’s Narrative of Facts. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1989.
Sanborn, Geoffrey. The Sign of the Cannibal: Melville and the Making of the Postcolonial Reader. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1998.
Schultz, Elizabeth. Unpainted to the Last: Moby-Dick and Twentieth-Century American Art. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1995.
Sealts, Merton M., Jr. Pursuing Melville, 1940–1980. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1982.
Seelye, John. Melville: The Ironic Diagram. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 1971.
Short, Bryan C.Cast by Means of Figures: Herman Melville’s Rhetorical Development. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1992.
Spanos, William V.The Errant Art of Moby-Dick: The Canon, the Cold War, and the Struggle for American Studies. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1995.
Spanos, William V.Herman Melville and the American Calling: The Fiction after Moby-Dick, 1851–1857. Albany: State University Press of New York, 2008.
Spanos, William V.The Exceptionalist State and the State of Exception: Herman’s Melville Billy Budd, Sailor. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011.
Spark, Clare L.Hunting Captain Ahab: Psychological Warfare and the Melville Revival. Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 2001.
Sten, Christopher. The Weaver-God, He Weaves: Melville and the Poetics of the Novel. Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 1996.
Stuckey, Sterling. African Culture and Melville’s Art: The Creative Process in Benito Cereno and Moby-Dick. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009.
Szendy, Peter. Prophecies of Leviathan: Reading Past Melville. New York: Fordham University Press, 2010.
Tally, Robert T., Jr. Melville, Mapping and Globalization: Literary Cartography in the American Baroque Writer. London: Continuum, 2009.
Thompson, Lawrence R.Melville’s Quarrel with God. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1952.
Tolchin, Neal L.Mourning, Gender, and Creativity in the Art of Herman Melville. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1988.
Vincent, Howard P.The Trying Out of Moby-Dick. Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 1980.
Wallace, Robert K.Melville and Turner: Spheres of Love and Fright. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1992.
Warren, Robert Penn. “Melville the Poet.” Kenyon Review 8 (1946): 20823.
Wenke, John. Melville’s Muse: Literary Creation and the Forms of Philosophical Fiction. Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 1995.

VII. Literary and Historical Studies with Sections on Melville

Some of the most influential work on Melville has appeared in contextual and theoretical studies that address a range of authors. The Melville texts that provide the focus of discussion, when limited to one or two, are indicated parenthetically.

Aaron, Daniel. The Unwritten War: American Writers and the Civil War. New York: Oxford University Press, 1973. [Battle-Pieces]
Agamben, Giorgio. Potentialities: Collected Essays in Philosophy. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2000. [“Bartleby”]
Berger, Jason. Antebellum at Sea: Maritime Fantasies in Nineteenth-Century America. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2012.
Bercovitch, Sacvan. The Rites of Assent: Transformations in the Symbolic Construction of America. New York: Routledge, 1993. [Pierre]
Blum, Hester. The View from the Masthead: Maritime Imagination and Antebellum Sea Narratives. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2008.
Brodhead, Richard H.Hawthorne, Melville, and the Novel. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1976.
Bromell, Nicholas K.By the Sweat of the Brow: Literature and Labor in Antebellum America. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1993. [Redburn]
Brown, Gillian. Domestic Individualism: Imagining Self in Nineteenth-Century America. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1990. [Pierre, “Bartleby”]
Cameron, Sharon. The Corporeal Self: Allegories of the Body in Melville and Hawthorne. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1981.
Cameron, SharonImpersonality: Seven Essays. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2007. [Billy Budd]
Casarino, Cesare. Modernity at Sea: Melville, Marx, Conrad in Crisis. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2002. [White-Jacket, Moby-Dick]
Cassuto, Leonard. The Inhuman Race: The Racial Grotesque in American Literature and Culture. New York: Columbia University Press, 1997. [Typee, “Benito Cereno”]
Castiglia, Christopher. Interior States: Institutional Consciousness and the Inner Life of Democracy in the Antebellum United States. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2008. [Pierre]
Castronovo, Russ. Fathering the Nation: American Genealogies of Slavery and Freedom. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995. [Moby-Dick, Israel Potter]
Charvat, William. The Profession of Authorship in America, 1800–1870: The Papers of William Charvat. Ed. Matthew J. Bruccoli. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 1978.
Coviello, Peter. Intimacy in America: Dreams of Affiliation in Antebellum Literature. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2005. [Moby-Dick]
Deleuze, Gilles. Essays Critical and Clinical. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1997. [“Bartleby”]
Dinius, Marcy J.The Camera and the Press: American Visual and Print Culture in the Age of the Daguerreotype. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012. [Pierre]
Douglass, Ann. The Feminization of American Culture. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1977.
Engel, William E.Early Modern Poetics in Melville and Poe: Memory, Melancholy, and the Emblematic Tradition. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2012. [“The Encantadas,” Moby-Dick]
Franchot, Jenny. Roads to Rome: The Antebellum Protestant Encounter with Catholicism. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994. [“The Two Temples,” “Benito Cereno”]
Gilmore, Michael T.American Romanticism and the Marketplace. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1985. [Moby-Dick, ‘Bartleby”]
Gilmore, Michael T.The War on Words: Slavery, Race, and Free Speech in American Literature. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2010. [Billy Budd]
Greeson, Jennifer Rae. Our South: Geographic Fantasy and the Rise of National Literature. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2010. [“Hawthorne and His Mosses,” Pierre]
Greiman, Jennifer. Democracy’s Spectacle: Sovereignty and Public Life in Antebellum American Writing. New York: Fordham University Press, 2010. [The Confidence-Man]
Grey, Robin. The Complicity of Imagination: The American Renaissance, Contests of Authority, and Seventeenth-Century English Culture. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press, 1997.
Hardack, Richard. “Not Altogether Human”: Pantheism and the Dark Nature of the American Renaissance. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2012.
Hsu, Hsuan L.Geography and the Production of Space in Nineteenth-Century American Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010.
Huang, Yunte. Transpacific Imaginations: History, Literature, Counterpoetics. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2008. [Moby-Dick]
Johnson, Barbara. The Critical Difference: Essays in the Contemporary Rhetoric of Reading. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1980. [Billy Budd]
Jones, Gavin. American Hungers: The Problem of Poverty in U.S. Literature, 1840–1945. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2008.
Lawrence, D. H.Studies in Classic American Literature. 1923. New York: Penguin Books, 1977. [Typee, Moby-Dick]
Lee, Maurice S.Slavery, Philosophy, and American Literature, 1830–1860. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005. [“Benito Cereno”]
Lee, Maurice S.Uncertain Chances: Science, Skepticism, and Belief in Nineteenth-Century American Literature. New York: Oxford University Press, 2012. [Moby-Dick, Pierre]
Leverenz, David. Manhood and the American Renaissance. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1989. [Moby-Dick]
Levine, Robert S.Conspiracy and Romance: Studies in Brockden Brown, Cooper, Hawthorne, and Melville. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989. [“Benito Cereno”]
Levine, Robert S.Dislocating Race and Nation: Studies in Nineteenth-Century American Literary Nationalism. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2008. [Pierre]
Luciano, Dana. Arranging Grief: Sacred Time and the Body in Nineteenth-Century American Literature. New York: New York University Press, 2007.
Machor, James L.Reading Fiction in Antebellum America: Informed Response and Reception Histories, 1820–1865. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011.
Marr, Timothy. The Cultural Roots of American Islamicism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006.
Matthiessen, F. O.American Renaissance: Art and Expression in the Age of Emerson and Whitman. New York: Oxford University Press, 1941.
McWilliams, John P., Jr. The American Epic: Transforming a Genre, 1770–1860. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989. [Moby-Dick]
Michael, John. Identity and the Failure of America: From Thomas Jefferson to the War on Terror. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2008. [Moby-Dick]
Miller, Perry. The Raven and the Whale: The War of Words and Wits in the Era of Poe and Melville. New York: Harcourt Brace & World, 1956.
Morrison, Toni. “Unspeakable Things Unspoken: The Afro-American Presence in American Literature.” Michigan Quarterly Review 28 (1989): 134. [Moby-Dick]
Nabers, Deak. Victory of Law: The Fourteenth Amendment, the Civil War, and American Literature, 1852–1867. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006. [Battle-Pieces]
Nelson, Dana D.The Word in Black and White: Reading “Race” in American Literature, 1638–1867. New York: Oxford University Press, 1992. [“Benito Cereno”]
Ngai, Sianne. Ugly Feelings. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2005. [Pierre, The Confidence-Man]
Obenzinger, Hilton. American Palestine: Melville, Twain, and the Holy Land Mania. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1999. [Clarel]
Otter, Samuel. Philadelphia Stories: America’s Literature of Race and Freedom (New York: Oxford University Press, 2010. [“Benito Cereno”]
Phillips, Christopher N.Epic in American Culture: Settlement to Reconstruction. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012.
Powell, Timothy B.Ruthless Democracy: A Multicultural Interpretation of the American Renaissance. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2000. [Moby-Dick]
Ramussen, Birget Brander. Queequeg’s Coffin: Indigenous Literacies and Early American Literature. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2012.
Reising, Russell T.Loose Ends: Closure and Crisis in the American Social Text. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1996. [Israel Potter]
Reynolds, Larry J.European Revolutions and the American Literary Renaissance. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1988. [Moby-Dick]
Reynolds, Larry J.Righteous Violence: Revolution, Slavery, and the American Renaissance. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2011. [Billy Budd]
Rowe, John Carlos. Literary Culture and U.S. Imperialism. New York: Oxford University Press, 2000. [Typee]
Ruttenburg, Nancy. Democratic Personality: Popular Voice and the Trial of American Authorship. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1998. [Billy Budd]
Ryan, Susan M.The Grammar of Good Intentions: Race and the Antebellum Culture of Benevolence. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2003. [“Benito Cereno,” The Confidence-Man]
Said, Edward. Reflections on Exile and Other Essays. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2000. [Moby-Dick]
Sanborn, Geoffrey. Whipscars and Tattoos: The Last of the Mohicans, Moby-Dick, and the Maori. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.
Sedgwick, Eve Kosofsky. Epistemology of the Closet. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1990. [Billy Budd]
Spengemann, William. Three American Poets: Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, and Herman Melville. Notre Dame, IN: Notre Dame University Press, 2010.
Sundquist, Eric J.Home as Found: Authority and Genealogy in Nineteenth-Century American Literature. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1979. [Pierre]
Sundquist, Eric J.To Wake the Nations: Race in the Making of American Literature. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1993. [“Benito Cereno”]
Sweet, Timothy. Traces of War: Poetry, Photography, and the Crisis of the Union. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1990. [Battle-Pieces]
Thomas, Brook. Cross-Examinations of Law and Literature: Cooper, Hawthorne, Stowe, and Melville. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987.
Thompson, Graham. Male Sexuality under Surveillance: The Office in American Literature. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2003.
Wald, Priscilla. Constituting Americans: Cultural Anxiety and Narrative Form. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1995. [Pierre]
Wallace, Robert K.Douglass and Melville: Anchored Together in Neighborly Style. New Bedford, MA: Spinner Publications, Inc., 2005.
Wallace, Robert K.Frank Stella’s Moby-Dick: Words and Shapes. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.
Warner, Michael. “What Like a Bullet Can Undeceive?Public Culture 15 (2003): 4154. [Battle-Pieces]
Weinstein, Cindy. Family, Kinship, and Sympathy in Nineteenth-Century American Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. [Pierre]
Weinstein, CindyThe Literature of Labor and the Labor of Literature: Allegory in Nineteenth-Century American Fiction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995.
Weisbuch, Robert. Atlantic Double-Cross: American Literature and British Influence in the Age of Emerson. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1986. [“Bartleby”]
Wilson, Ivy G.Specters of Democracy: Blackness and the Aesthetics of Politics in the Antebellum U.S. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011. [“Benito Cereno”]

VIII. Digital Scholarship and Websites

The Melville Electronic Library is in progress and will make available a wide range of newly edited Melville texts, along with pertinent contexts; it promises to be the primary digital research archive for Melville studies. Melville’s Marginalia offers invaluable material on Melville’s reading. The Melville Society website has links to texts, archival resources, conferences, and Melville-inspired events. The URLs given below are current as of 2013.

Bryant, John and Wyn Kelley. Melville Electronic Library. http://mel.hofstra.edu/.
Bryant, John, ed. Herman Melville’s Typee: A Fluid Text Edition. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009. http://rotunda.upfress.virginia.edu/melville/.
The Melville Society. http://melvillesociety.org/.
Olson-Smith, Steven, Peter Norberg, and Dennis C. Marmon. Melville’s Marginalia Online. http://melvillesmarginalia.org/front.php.