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  • Print publication year: 2012
  • Online publication date: June 2018

16 - ANCIL: a new curriculum for information literacy: case study

from PART 2 - CASE STUDIES

Summary

You have learned something. That always feels at first as if you had lost something.

(H. G. Wells)

Introduction

Recent research suggests that the information-seeking behaviour and needs of students are changing (CIBER/UCL, 2008; SCONUL, 2011 among others), driven largely by the changing experiences and expectations of ‘the Google generation’, who have grown up with access to the internet being the norm. While the Google generation and ‘digital native’ terms have been debated and widely criticized (Jones et al., 2010), it is clear that information literacy programmes over the next five years will need to adapt and respond to the needs of current students.

This case study describes a short project based at Cambridge University Library and funded by the Arcadia Programme (http://arcadiaproject. lib.cam.ac.uk), a three-year initiative designed to explore the role of academic libraries in the digital age. The project ran from May until July 2011 and sought to develop a practical curriculum for information literacy that meets the needs of the undergraduate student entering higher education over the next five years.

A new curriculum for information literacy: project overview

Aims and objectives

The project sought to develop a practical curriculum for information literacy that meets the needs of the undergraduate student entering higher education over the next five years. Specifically, the project aimed:

  • • to understand the information needs of future undergraduate students on entering higher education
  • • to develop a revolutionary curriculum for information literacy that could be used with undergraduate students entering UK higher education
  • • to provide practical guidance about how best to equip students with the knowledge, skills and behaviours, in terms of information use, to support their learning in the digital age
  • • to develop a flexible curriculum that could be used and adapted in the higher education community and used in face-to-face, blended and online learning provision.
  • Methodology

    The authors carried out an extensive review of the literature, which forms the theoretical background to this project. A modified Delphi study was undertaken which involved consulting widely with experts in the information and education communities. The curriculum was developed and presented to the expert group and took into account findings from the literature and from the expert consultation. It was subsequently refined and a final curriculum, with a number of supporting documents, was produced.