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Edgar Allan Poe in Context
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Book description

Edgar Allan Poe mastered a variety of literary forms over the course of his brief and turbulent career. As a storyteller, Poe defied convention by creating Gothic tales of mystery, horror and suspense that remain widely popular today. This collection demonstrates how Poe's experience of early nineteenth-century American life fueled his iconoclasm and shaped his literary legacy. Rather than provide critical explications of his writings, each essay explores one aspect of Poe's immediate environment, using pertinent writings - verse, fiction, reviews and essays - to suit. Examining his geographical, social and literary contexts, as well as those created by the publishing industry and advances in science and technology, the essays paint an unprecedented portrait of Poe's life and times. Written for a wide audience, the collection will offer scholars and students of American literature, historians and general readers new insight into Poe's rich and complex work.

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Contents


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Page 1 of 2


Further Reading

What follows is a highly selective list of suggestions for further reading about Edgar Allan Poe and about the contexts examined in this collection. After the first section, which is devoted to biographies and biographical resources, each of the remaining thirty-seven sections pertains to a different chapter in this book. Many of the books and articles have been suggested for inclusion by multiple contributors; they have been placed in the section that seems most relevant. These suggestions for further reading are meant to supplement the notes at the end of each chapter.

Biography

Hayes, Kevin J., Edgar Allan Poe. London: Reaktion, 2009.
Hutchisson, James M., Poe. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2005.
Miller, John Carl, ed. Building Poe Biography. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1977.
Phillips, Mary Elizabeth, Edgar Allan Poe: The Man, 2 vols. Chicago: John C. Winston, 1926.
Poe, Edgar Allan. The Collected Letters of Edgar Allan Poe, ed. John Ward Ostrom, Burton R. Pollin, and Jeffrey A. Savoye, 2 vols. New York: Gordian, 2008.
Quinn, Arthur Hobson, Edgar Allan Poe: A Critical Biography. New York: Appleton-Century, 1941.
Silverman, Kenneth, Edgar A. Poe: Mournful and Never-Ending Remembrance. New York: HarperCollins, 1991.
Thomas, Dwight, and David K. Jackson, The Poe Log: A Documentary Life of Edgar Allan Poe, 1809–1849. Boston: G. K. Hall, 1987.
Walsh, John Evangelist, Midnight Dreary: The Mysterious Death of Edgar Allan Poe. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1998.
Whitman, Sarah Helen. Poe’s Helen Remembers, ed. John Carl Miller. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1979.

Great Britain

Allen, Michael L.Poe and the British Magazine Tradition. New York: Oxford University Press, 1969.
Fisher, Benjamin F. “Poe in Great Britain,” in Poe Abroad: Influence, Reputation, Affinities, ed. Lois Davis Vines. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 1999. 52–61.
Giles, Paul. Transatlantic Insurrections: British Culture and the Formation of American Literature, 1730–1860. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2001.
Lease, Benjamin. Anglo-American Encounters: England and the Rise of American Literature. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1981.

The South

Bondurant, Agnes Meredith. Poe’s Richmond. Richmond: Garrett and Massie, 1942.
Branham, Amy. “Gothic Displacements: Poe’s South in Politian,” in Edgar Allan Poe: Beyond Gothicism, ed. James M. Hutchisson. Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2011. 69–87.
Gray, Richard J.Southern Aberrations: Writers of the American South and the Problem of Regionalism. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2000.
Hubbell, Jay B.The South in American Literature, 1607–1900. Durham: Duke University Press, 1954.
Jones, Paul C.Unwelcome Voices: Subversive Fiction in the Antebellum South. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2005.
Rubin, Louis D.The Edge of the Swamp: A Study in the Literature and Society of the Old South. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1989.

The West

Fussell, Edwin S.Frontier: American Literature and the American West. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1965.
Greenfield, Bruce R.Narrating Discovery: The Romantic Explorer in American Literature, 1790–1855. New York: Columbia University Press, 1992.
LeMenager, Stephanie. Manifest and Other Destinies: Territorial Fictions of the Nineteenth-Century United States. Lincoln: Nebraska University Press, 2004.
Lewis, Nathaniel. Unsettling the Literary West: Authenticity and Authorship. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2003.
Rusk, Ralph Leslie. The Literature of the Midwestern Frontier, 2 vols. New York: Columbia University Press, 1925.

The Sea

Harvey, Ronald C.The Critical History of Edgar Allan Poe’s The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym: “A Dialogue with Unreason.”New York: Garland, 1998.
Kopley, Richard, ed. Poe’s Pym: Critical Explorations. Durham: Duke University Press, 1992.
Lyons, Paul. American Pacificism: Oceana in the U.S. Imagination. New York: Routlege, 2006.
Sanborn, Geoffrey. “A Confused Beginning: The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym, of Nantucket,” in The Cambridge Companion to Edgar Allan Poe, ed. Kevin J. Hayes. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2002. 163–77.

France

Baudelaire, Charles. Baudelaire on Poe: Critical Papers, ed. and trans. Lois Hyslop and Francis E. Hyslop, Jr. State College, PA: Bald Eagle Press, 1952.
Hayes, Kevin J. “One-Man Modernist,” in The Cambridge Companion to Edgar Allan Poe, ed. Kevin J. Hayes. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2002. 225–40.
Quinn, Patrick F.The French Face of Edgar Poe. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1957.
Vines, Lois Davis. “Charles Baudelaire,” in Poe Abroad: Influence, Reputation, Affinities, ed. Lois Davis Vines. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 1999. 165–70.
Vines, Lois Davis “Poe in France,” in Poe Abroad: Influence, Reputation, Affinities, ed. Lois Davis Vines. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 1999. 9–18.
Vines, Lois Davis “Stéphane Mallarmé and Paul Valéry,” in Poe Abroad: Influence, Reputation, Affinities, ed. Lois Davis Vines. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 1999. 171–6.

The Near East

Allison, Robert J.The Crescent Obscured: the United States and the Muslim World, 1776–1815. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000.
Irwin, John T.American Hieroglyphics: The Symbol of the Egyptian Hieroglyphics in the American Renaissance. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1980.
Montgomery, Travis. “Poe’s Oriental Gothic: ‘Metzengerstein’ (1832), ‘The Visionary’ (1834), ‘Berenice’ (1835), the Imagination, and Authorship’s Perils.” Gothic Studies 12 (2010): 4–28.
Montgomery, TravisTurning East: Edgar Allan Poe’s Poems (1831), the Orient, and the Renewal of American Verse. Baltimore: Edgar Allan Poe Society, 2011.
Trafton, Scott. Egypt Land: Race and Nineteenth-Century American Egyptomania. Durham: Duke University Press, 2004.
Yothers, Brian. ‘Desert of the Blest’: Poe’s Anti-Representational Invocations of the Near East.” Gothic Studies 12 (2010): 53–60.

The Polar Regions

Jones, Darryl. “Ultima Thule: Arthur Gordon Pym, the Polar Imaginary, and the Hollow Earth.” Edgar Allan Poe Review 11 (2010): 51–69.
Nelson, Victoria. “Symmes Hole: or, The South Polar Romance.” Raritan 17 (1997): 136–66.
Standish, David. Hollow Earth: The Long and Curious History of Imagining Strange Lands, Fantastical Creatures, Advanced Civilizations, and Marvelous Machines Below the Earth’s Surface. Cambridge, MA: Da Capo, 2006.
Stanton, William. The Great United States Exploring Expedition of 1838–1842. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1975.

The Urban Environment

Brand, Dana. The Spectator and the City: Fantasies of Urban Legibility in Nineteenth-Century England and America. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1991.
Hayes, Kevin J. “Understanding ‘Why the Little Frenchman Wears His Hand in a Sling,’” in Edgar Allan Poe: Beyond Gothicism, ed. James M. Hutchisson. Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2011. 119–28.
Hayes, Kevin J.Visual Culture and the Word in Edgar Allan Poe’s ‘Man of the Crowd.’” Nineteenth-Century Literature 56 (2002): 445–65.
Merivale, Patricia. “Gumshoe Gothics: Poe’s ‘The Man of the Crowd’ and his Followers,” in Detecting Texts: The Metaphysical Detective Story from Poe to Postmodernism, ed. Patricia Merivale and Susan Elizabeth Sweeney. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1999. 101–16.
Werner, James V.American Flaneur: The Cosmic Physiognomy of Edgar Allan Poe. New York: Routledge, 2004.

Curiosity

Barnum, P. T.The Colossal P. T. Barnum Reader: Nothing Else Like It in the Universe, ed. James W. Cook. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2005.
Bogdan, Robert. Freak Show: Presenting Human Oddities for Amusement and Profit. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1988.
Harris, Neil. Humbug: The Art of P. T. Barnum. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1973.
Reiss, Benjamin. The Showman and the Slave: Race, Death, and Memory in Barnum’s America. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2001.

Alcohol, Addiction, and Rehabilitation

Chavigny, Katherine A. “Reforming Drunkards in Nineteenth-Century America: Religion, Medicine, Therapy,” in Altering American Consciousness: The History of Alcohol and Drug Use in the United States, 1800–2000, ed. Sarah W. Tracy and Caroline Jean Acker. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2004. 108–23.
Hendler, Glenn. “Bloated Bodies and Sober Sentiments: Masculinity in 1840s Temperance Narratives,” in Sentimental Men: Masculinity and the Politics of Affect in American Culture, ed. Mary Chapman and Glenn Hendler. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999. 125–48.
Mintz, Steven. Moralists and Modernizers: America’s Pre-Civil War Reformers. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1995.
Reynolds, David S. “Black Cats and Delirium Tremens: Temperance and the American Renaissance,” in The Serpent in the Cup: Temperance in American Literature, ed. David S. Reynolds and Debra J. Rosenthal. Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press, 1997. 22–59.
Rorabaugh, W. J.The Alcoholic Republic: An American Tradition. New York: Oxford University Press, 1979.
Tyrrell, Ian. Sobering Up: From Temperance to Prohibition in Antebellum America. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1979.

Fashion, Furnishings, and Style

Halttunen, Karen. Confidence Men and Painted Women: A Study of Middle-Class Culture in America, 1830–1870. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1982.
Hayes, Kevin J.The Flaneur in the Parlor: Poe’s ‘Philosophy of Furniture.’” Prospects 27 (2002): 103–19.
Severa, Joan. Dressed for the Photographer: Ordinary Americans and Fashion, 1840–1900. Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 1995.
Zakim, Michael. Ready-Made Democracy: A History of Men’s Dress in the American Republic, 1760–1860. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003.

The American Stage

Fagin, Nathan Bryllion. The Histrionic Mr. Poe. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press, 1949.
Nathans, Heather S.Early American Theatre from the Revolution to Thomas Jefferson: Into the Hands of the People. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2003.
Shaffer, Jason. Performing Patriotism: National Identity in the Colonial and Revolutionary American Theater. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2007.
Smith, Geddeth. The Brief Career of Eliza Poe. Rutherford, NJ: Farleigh Dickinson University Press, 1988.
Wilmeth, Don B., and C. W. E. Bigsby, eds. The Cambridge History of American Theatre, 3 vols. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998–2000.

Slavery and Abolitionism

Goddu, Teresa A. “Poe, Sensationalism, and Slavery,” in The Cambridge Companion to Edgar Allan Poe, ed. Kevin J. Hayes. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2002. 92–112.
Jones, Paul Christian. “The Danger of Sympathy: Edgar Allan Poe’s ‘Hop-Frog’ and the Abolitionist Rhetoric of Pathos.” Journal of American Studies 35 (2001): 239–54.
Kennedy, J. Gerald, and Liliane Weissberg, eds. Romancing the Shadow: Poe and Race. New York: Oxford University Press, 2001.
Otter, Samuel. Philadelphia Stories: America’s Literature of Race and Freedom. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010.
Whalen, Terence. Edgar Allan Poe and the Masses: The Political Economy of Literature in Antebellum America. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1999.

The Cult of Mourning

Farrell, James J.Inventing the American Way of Death: 1830–1920. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1980.
Isenberg, Nancy, and Burstein, Andrew. Mortal Remains: Death in Early America. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2003.
Kete, Mary Louise. Sentimental Collaborations: Mourning and Middle-Class Identity in Nineteenth-Century America. Durham: Duke University Press, 2000.
Schor, Esther H.Bearing the Dead: The British Culture of Mourning from the Enlightenment to Victoria. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1994.

Lions and Bluestockings

Boyd, Anne E., ed. Wielding the Pen: Writings on Authorship by American Women of the Nineteenth Century. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009.
Marchalonis, Shirley, ed. Patrons and Protégées: Gender, Friendship, and Writing in Nineteenth-Century America. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1994.
Richards, ElizaGender and the Poetics of Reception in Poe’s Circle. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004.
Tomc, Sandra M. “Poe and His Circle,” in The Cambridge Companion to Edgar Allan Poe, ed. Kevin J. Hayes. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2002. 21–41.

The Literary Profession

Bender, Thomas. Intellect and Public Life: Essays on the Social History of Academic Intellectuals in the United States. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1993.
Charvat, William. The Profession of Authorship in America, 1800–1870. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 1968.
Evelev, John. Tolerable Entertainment: Herman Melville and Professionalism in Antebellum New York. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2006.
Hayes, Kevin J.Poe and the Printed Word. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

Magazines

Jackson, David Kelly. Poe and the Southern Literary Messenger. Richmond: Dietz, 1934.
Jacobs, Robert D.Poe, Journalist and Critic. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1969.
Mott, Frank Luther. A History of American Magazines. 5 vols. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press, 1938–68.
Tebbel, John, and Mary Ellen Zuckerman. The Magazine in America 1741–1990. New York: Oxford University Press, 1991.

Gift Books

Elliott, Jock. Inventing Christmas: How Our Holiday Came to Be. New York: H. N. Abrams, 2002.
Lehuu, Isabelle. Carnival on the Page: Popular Print Media in Antebellum America. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2000.
Piper, Andrew. Dreaming in Books: The Making of the Bibliographic Imagination in the Romantic Age. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009.
Thompson, Ralph. American Literary Annuals and Gift Books, 1825–1865. New York: H. W. Wilson, 1936.

Literary Piracy

Barnes, James J.Authors, Publishers and Politicians: The Quest for an Anglo-American Copyright Agreement, 1815–1854. London: Routledge and Keegan Paul, 1974.
Everton, Michael J.The Grand Chorus of Complaint: Authors and the Business Ethics of American Publishing. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.
Johns, Adrian. Piracy: The Intellectual Property Wars from Gutenberg to Gates. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009.
McGill, Meredith L.American Literature and the Culture of Reprinting. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2003.

The Art of Reviewing

Dameron, J. Lasley. “Poe and Blackwood’s on the Art of Reviewing.” ESQ 31 (1963): 29–30.
Ljungquist, Kent. “The Poet as Critic,” in The Cambridge Companion to Edgar Allan Poe, ed. Kevin J. Hayes. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2002. 7–20.
Parks, Edd Winfield, Edgar Allan Poe as Literary Critic. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1964.
Rowland, William G.Literature and the Marketplace: Romantic Writers and Their Audiences in Great Britain and the United States. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1996.
St. Clair, William. The Reading Nation in the Romantic Period. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004.

The Politics of Publishing

Dowling, David O.The Business of Literary Circles in Nineteenth-Century America. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
Dowling, David O.Capital Letters: Authorship in the Antebellum Literary Market. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2009.
Hartmann, Jonathan H., The Marketing of Edgar Allan Poe. New York: Routledge, 2008.
Moss, Sidney P. Poe’sLiterary Battles: The Critic in the Context of His Literary Milieu. Durham: Duke University Press, 1963.
Scherman, Timothy. “The Authority Effect: Poe and the Politics of Reputation in the Pre-Industry of American Publishing.” Arizona Quarterly 49 (1993): 1–19.
Thompson, G. R.Literary Politics and the ‘Legitimate Sphere’: Poe, Hawthorne, and the ‘Tale Proper.’” Nineteenth-Century Literature 49 (1994): 167–95.

Ancient Classics

Campbell, Killis. “Poe’s Reading.” Texas Studies in English 5 (1925): 166–96.
Holt, Palmer C.Poe and H. N. Coleridge’s Greek Classic Poets: ‘Pinakidia,’ ‘Politian’ and ‘Morella’ Sources.” American Literature 34 (1962): 8–30.
Norman, E. K.Poe’s Knowledge of Latin.” American Literature 6 (1934): 72–7.
Preston, J. T. L. “Some Reminiscences of Edgar A. Poe as a Schoolboy,” in Edgar Allan Poe: A Memorial Volume, ed. Sara Sigourney Rice. Baltimore: Turnbull, 1877. 37–42.
Reynhold, Meyer. Classica Americana. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1984.
Unrue, D. H.Edgar Allan Poe: The Romantic as Classicist.” International Journal of the Classical Tradition 1 (1995): 112–19.
Winterer, Caroline. The Culture of Classicism. Ancient Greece and Rome in American Intellecual Life, 1780–1910. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002. 29–43.

Rabelais and Lesage

Bakhtin, M. M.The Dialogic Imagination: Four Essays, trans. Varyl Emerson and Michael Holquist. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1981.
Bakhtin, M. M.Rabelais and His World, trans. Helene Iswolsky. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1984.
Royot, Daniel. “Poe’s Humor,” in The Cambridge Companion to Edgar Allan Poe, ed. Kevin J. Hayes. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2002. 57–71.
Wetzel, George. “The Source of Poe’s ‘Man that Was Used Up.’” Notes and Queries 198 (1953): 38.
Zimmerman, Brett. Edgar Allan Poe: Rhetoric and Style. Montreal: McGill-Queens University Press, 2005.

The Gothic Movement

Bailey, Dale. American Nightmares: The Haunted House Formula in American Popular Fiction. Bowling Green: Bowling Green State University Popular Press, 1999.
Crow, Charles L.American Gothic. Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2009.
Fisher, Benjamin Franklin. “Poe and the Gothic Tradition,” in The Cambridge Companion to Edgar Allan Poe, ed. Kevin J. Hayes. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2002. 72–91.
Goddu, Teresa A.Gothic America: Narrative, History, and Nation. New York: Columbia University Press, 1997.
Hayes, Kevin J.Retzsch’s Outlines and Poe’s ‘The Man of the Crowd.’” Gothic Studies 12 (2010): 29–41.
Ringe, Donald A.American Gothic: Imagination and Reason in Nineteenth-Century Fiction. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1982.
Smith, Andrew. Gothic Literature. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2007.

Byron

Bachinger, Katarina. The Multi-Man Genre and Poe’s Byrons. Salzburg: Institut fur Anglistik und Amerikanistik, 1987.
Campbell, Killis. “Poe’s Indebtedness to Byron.” Nation, 11 March 1909, 248–9.
Chivers, T. H.Life of Poe, ed. Richard Beale Davis. New York: Dutton, 1952.
Soule, George H., Jr. “Byronism in Poe’s ‘Metzengerstein” and “William Wilson.” ESQ 24 (1978): 152–62.

Folk Narrative

Brown, Carolyn S.The Tall Tale in American Folklore and Literature. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1987.
Hayes, Kevin J.Folklore and Book Culture. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1997.
Hayes, Kevin J.Melville’s Folk Roots. Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 1999.
Hoffman, Daniel. Form and Fable in American Fiction. New York: Oxford University Press, 1961.
Jones, Steven Swann. Folklore and Literature in the United States: An Annotated Further-Reading of Studies of Folklore in American Literature. New York: Garland, 1984.

Transcendentalism

Casale, Ottavio. “Poe on Transcendentalism.” ESQ 50 (1968): 85–97.
Gardner, Stanton. “Emerson, Thoreau, and Poe’s ‘Double Dupin,’” in Poe and His Times: The Artist and His Milieu, ed. Benjamin F. Fisher (Baltimore: Edgar Allan Poe Society, 2. 130–45.
Griffith, Clark. “‘Emersonianism’ and ‘Poeism’: Some Versions of the Romantic Sensibility.” Modern Language Quarterly 22 (1961): 125–34.
Myerson, Joel, ed. The Transcendentalists: A Review of Research and Criticism. New York: Modern Language Association of America, 1984.

Charles Dickens

Bracher, Peter, “Poe as a Critic of Dickens,” Dickens Studies Newsletter 9 (1978): 109–11.
Caserio, Robert L., Plot, Story, and the Novel: From Dickens and Poe to the Modern Period. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1979.
Galvan, Fernando Galvan. “Plagiarism in Poe: Revisiting the Poe-Dickens Relationship.” Edgar Allan Poe Review, 10 (2009): 14–20.
Galvan, Fernando Galvan “Poe Versus Dickens,” in A Descent into Edgar Allan Poe and His Works: The Bicentennial, ed. Beatriz González Moreno and Margarita Rigal Aragón (New York: Peter Lang, 2010). 3–24.
Moss, Sidney P.Charles Dickens’ Quarrel with America. Troy, NY: Whitston, 1984.
Moss, Sidney P. and Carolyn Moss. American Episodes Involving Charles Dickens. Troy, NY: Whitston, 1999.
Slater, Michael. Charles Dickens. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2009.

Nathaniel Hawthorne

Idol, John L., and Buford Jones. Nathaniel Hawthorne: The Contemporary Reviews. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1994.
Levin, Harry. The Power of Blackness: Hawthorne, Poe, Melville. New York: Knopf, 1958.
Miller, Edwin Haviland. Salem is My Dwelling Place: A Life of Nathaniel Hawthorne. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 1991.
Person, Leland S.The Cambridge Introduction to Nathaniel Hawthorne. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007.
Sutherland, Judith L.The Problematic Fictions of Poe, James, and Hawthorne. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1984.

Phrenology

Colbert, Charles. A Measure of Perfection: Phrenology and the Fine Arts in America. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997.
Cooter, Roger. The Cultural Meaning of Popular Science: Phrenology and the Organization of Consent in Nineteenth-Century Britain. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1984.
Stern, Madeleine B.Heads and Headlines: The Phrenological Fowlers. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1971.
Tomlinson, Stephen. Head Masters: Phrenology, Secular Education, and Nineteenth-Century Social Thought. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2005.

Photography

Deas, Michael. The Portraits and Daguerreotypes of Edgar Allan Poe. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1989.
Hayes, Kevin J.Poe, the Daguerreotype, and the Autobiographical Act.” Biography, 25 (2002): 477–92.
Hayes, Kevin J.Poe’s “Spectacles” and the Camera Lens. Baltimore: The Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore, 2007.
Rudisilll, Richard. Mirror Image: The Influence of the Daguerreotype on American Society. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1971.
Tresch, John. “Estrangement of Vision: Edgar Allan Poe’s Optics,” in Observing Nature / Representing Experience: The Osmotic Dynamics of Romanticism, 1800–1850, ed. Erna Fiorenti. Berlin: Reimer Verlag, 2007. 126–57.
Williams, Susan S.Confounding Images: Photography and Portraiture in Antebellum American Fiction. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1997.

Mesmerism

Coale, Samuel. Mesmerism and Hawthorne: Mediums of American Romance. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1998.
Mesmer, Franz Anton. Mesmerism: A Translation of the Original Scientific and Medical Writings of F. A. Mesmer, trans. and ed. George Bloch. Los Altos, CA: William Kaufman, 1980.
Mills, Bruce. Poe, Fuller, and the Mesmeric Arts: Transition States in the American Renaissance. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 2006.
Schmit, David. “Re-visioning Antebellum American Psychology: The Dissemination of Mesmerism, 1836–1854.” History of Psychology 8 (2005): 403–34.
Willis, Martin. Mesmerists, Monsters, and Machines: Science Fiction and the Cultures of Science in the Nineteenth Century. Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 2006.

Architecture

Clark, Clifford Edward. The American Family Home, 1800–1960. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1986.
Downing, A. J.A. J. Downing’s Cottage Residences, Rural Architecture and Landscape Gardening, ed. Michael Hugo-Brunt. Watkins Glen, NY: Library of Victorian Culture, 1967.
Frayne, Anthony J.The Rose-Covered Cottage of Edgar Allan Poe in Philadelphia. Philadelphia: A. J. Frayne, 1934.
Hussey, E. C.Cottage Architecture of Victorian America. New York: Dover, 1994.
Maynard, W. Barksdale. Architecture in the United States, 1800–1850. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2002.

Science Fiction

Disch, Thomas M.On SF. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2005.
Franklin, H. Bruce. Future Perfect: American Science Fiction of the Nineteenth Century. New York: Oxford University Press, 1966.
Goulet, Andrea. Optiques: The Science of the Eye and the Birth of Modern French Fiction. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2006.
Limon, John. The Place of Fiction in the Time of Science: A Disciplinary History of American Writing. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990.
Scholnick, Robert J.American Literature and Science. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1992.
Tresch, John. “Extra! Extra! Poe Invents Science Fiction!” in The Cambridge Companion to Edgar Allan Poe, ed. Kevin J. Hayes. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2002. 113–32.

Cosmology and Cosmogony

Coveney, Peter, and Roger Highfield. Frontiers of Complexity: The Search for Order in a Chaotic World. London: Faber and Faber, 1995.
Secord, James. Victorian Sensation: The Extraordinary Publication, Reception, and Secret Authorship of Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000.
Swirski, Peter. Between Literature and Science: Poe, Lem, and Explorations in Aesthetics, Cognitive Science, and Literary Knowledge. Montreal: McGill-Queens University Press, 2000.
Taylor, Jonathan. Science and Omniscience in Nineteenth Century Literature. Brighton: Sussex Academic Press, 2007.

Forensic Science

Stashower, Daniel. The Beautiful Cigar Girl: Mary Rogers, Edgar Allan Poe, and the Invention of Murder. New York: Dutton, 2006.
Thomas, Ronald R.Detective Fiction and the Rise of Forensic Science. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1999.
Thoms, Peter. Detection and Its Designs: Narrative and Power in 19th-Century Detective Fiction. Athens: Ohio University Press, 1998.
Walsh, John Evangelist. Poe the Detective: The Curious Circumstances behind “The Mystery of Marie Rogêt.”New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1967.

Technology

Benesch, Klaus. Romantic Cyborgs: Authorship and Technology in the American Renaissance. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2002.
Cowan, Ruth Schwartz. A Social History of American Technology. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997.
Egan, Ken, Jr. “Edgar Allan Poe and the Horror of Technology.” ESQ 48 (2002): 187–208.
Marx, Leo. The Machine in the Garden: Technology and the Pastoral Ideal in America. New York: Oxford University Press, 1964.
Nye, David. America as Second Creation: Technology and Narratives of New Beginnings. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2004.
Orvell, Miles. “Virtual Culture and the Logic of American Technology.” Revue Française d’Etudes Americaines 76 (1998): 12–27.
Tresch, John. “The Potent Magic of Verisimilitude: Edgar Allan Poe within the Mechanical Age.” British Journal for the History of Science 30 (1997): 275–90.