Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
  • Print publication year: 2017
  • Online publication date: May 2018

8 - Memory and Other Cognitive Processes

Summary

Learning Objectives

  • • To describe the cognitive processes and brain regions associated with visual attention.
  • • To compare the brain regions associated with visual attention to working memory and long-term memory.
  • • To describe the cognitive processes and brain regions associated with visual imagery.
  • • To compare the brain regions associated with visual imagery to working memory and long-term memory.
  • • To list the two primary brain regions associated with language processing and name two ways in which language processing is relevant to memory.
  • • To identify the two regions that interact to enhance memory for emotional information.
  • Attention is focused on the contents of all explicit memories. The experience of detailed recollection seems similar to the experience of vivid imagery. This chapter compares the cognitive processes and brain regions associated with memory to the cognitive processes and brain regions associated with attention, imagery, language, and emotion. Section 8.1 reviews the brain regions that have been associated with attention, which include sensory processing regions in addition to dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and parietal cortex control regions. These regions are similar to the regions that have been associated with working memory and long-term memory (except for the additional dependence of long-term memory on the medial temporal lobe; see Chapters 3 and 6). In section 8.2 of this chapter, the brain regions associated with imagery are reviewed, which also include sensory processing regions, the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and the parietal cortex. The cognitive processes and brain processes associated with visual imagery are compared to the cognitive processes and brain processes associated with working memory and long-term memory. Section 8.3 details the regions of the brain associated with language processing, which include the left inferior dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the left posterior lateral temporal cortex. These regions are of relevance to memory studies, which often use words and meaningful objects as stimuli that have language/conceptual representations. The final section, 8.4, considers the brain regions that have been associated with emotion, which include the amygdala (a region just anterior to the hippocampus) and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

    Related content

    Powered by UNSILO
    Ikkai, A. & Curtis, C. E. (2011). Common neural mechanisms supporting spatial working memory, attention and motor intention. Neuropsychologia, 49, 1428–1434.
    Slotnick, S. D., Thompson, W. L. & Kosslyn, S. M. (2012). Visual memory and visual mental imagery recruit common control and sensory regions of the brain. Cognitive Neuroscience, 3, 14–20.
    Friederici, A. D. & Gierhan, S. M. (2013). The language network. Current Opinion in Neurobiology, 23, 250–254.
    Mickley Steinmetz, K. R., Schmidt, K., Zucker, H. R. & Kensinger, E. A. (2012). The effect of emotional arousal and retention delay on subsequent-memory effects. Cognitive Neuroscience, 3, 150–159.