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Figures

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 September 2023

Henry Gao
Affiliation:
Singapore Management University
Damian Raess
Affiliation:
University of Bern
Ka Zeng
Affiliation:
University of Arkansas
Type
Chapter
Information
China and the WTO
A Twenty-Year Assessment
, pp. viii - ix
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NC
This content is Open Access and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence CC-BY-NC 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/cclicenses/

Figures

  1. 1.1China’s annual foreign trade, 2001–2020

  2. 1.2China’s inward and outward FDI, 2001–2020

  3. 3.1Synthetic China A

  4. 3.2Synthetic China B

  5. 3.3Average post-treatment normalized GDP gap

  6. 3.4China and synthetic China

  7. 6.1China’s agricultural trade 2000–2020 (USD billion)

  8. 6.2China’s agricultural exports by product type, 2000 and 2020

  9. 6.3China’s per capita meat consumption and income, 1961–2018

  10. 6.4Wheat prices (USD/tonne)

  11. 6.5China’s stocks of corn, cotton, rice, and wheat (measured in days of use)

  12. 6.6China’s Producer Support Estimate (PSE) as a percent of the value of agricultural production

  13. 6.7China’s agricultural imports, change from 2019 to 2020

  14. 9.1Patterns of coalition partners in Chinese submissions in the WTO Trade Negotiating Committee and its sub-groups (2001–2019)

  15. 9.2To what extent do you feel that China’s negotiating positions in the WTO overlap with the interests of developing countries?

  16. 9.3To what extent do you feel that Chinese negotiating positions during the Doha round were informed by historical roles that reaffirm the importance of South-South cooperation?

  17. 11.1Top users of the WTO dispute settlement system

  18. 13.1Globalization losers and support for EU PTA vs. China PTA

  19. 13.2Support for EU PTA vs. China PTA among low-status individuals

  20. 13.3Partisan orientation and support for EU PTA vs. China PTA

  21. 14.1aU.S. responses to different countries

  22. 14.1bAustralian responses to different countries

  23. 14.1cGerman responses to different countries

  24. 14.2aDifferences U.S. responses Treatment*Partner

  25. 14.2bDifferences Australian responses Treatment*Partner

  26. 14.2cDifferences German responses Treatment*Partner

  27. 14.3aU.S. predicted responses to Policy*Alliance

  28. 14.3bAustralian predicted responses to Policy*Alliance

  29. 14.3cGerman predicted responses to Policy*Alliance

  30. 14.4aAlly-Adversary perception of U.S. citizens

  31. 14.4bAlly-Adversary perception of Australian citizens

  32. 14.4cAlly-Adversary perception of German citizens

  33. 15.1China has become an exporting and importing powerhouse

  34. 15.2China has consistently generated trade surpluses this century

  35. 15.3A steady stream of WTO dispute settlement cases have been brought against China

  36. 15.4By a large margin, the United States has brought the most dispute settlement cases against China

  37. 15.5Over time a growing number of dumping and countervailing duty investigations have been initiated on products exported from China

  38. 15.6The growing shares of Chinese manufactured exports facing unilateral measures in trading partners

  39. 15.7Thirty percent of Chinese manufactured exports face three or more trade-related hurdles in foreign markets

  40. 15.8Large shares of Chinese exports faced hurdles in the U.S. market before President Trump took office

  41. 15.9Market access impairment in the EU is longstanding

  42. 15.10The hurdles erected to Chinese exports in its own region cover proportionally less trade than those erected in the EU and the U.S.

  43. 15.11Targeting Chinese exports has become more common during the past decade

  44. 15.12Chinese goods exports are more exposed to market access curbs in trading partners than exports from other nations

  45. 19.1Chinese IIAs signed per year and cumulatively, 1982–2017

  46. 21.1Chinese greenfield FDI, 2010–2020

  47. 21.2Top ten recipients of Chinese greenfield FDI, 2010–2020

  48. 21.3Chinese greenfield FDI by sector, 2010–2020

  49. 21.4Chinese greenfield FDI activities, 2010–2020

  50. 21.5Chinese greenfield FDI by region, 2010–2020

  51. 21.6Longitudinal trends in Chinese FDI by region

  52. 21.7Map of Chinese greenfield FDI, 2010–2020

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  • Figures
  • Edited by Henry Gao, Singapore Management University, Damian Raess, University of Bern, Ka Zeng, University of Arkansas
  • Book: China and the WTO
  • Online publication: 14 September 2023
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  • Figures
  • Edited by Henry Gao, Singapore Management University, Damian Raess, University of Bern, Ka Zeng, University of Arkansas
  • Book: China and the WTO
  • Online publication: 14 September 2023
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  • Figures
  • Edited by Henry Gao, Singapore Management University, Damian Raess, University of Bern, Ka Zeng, University of Arkansas
  • Book: China and the WTO
  • Online publication: 14 September 2023
Available formats
×