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  • Print publication year: 2019
  • Online publication date: September 2019

Introduction

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      • Introduction
      • Simon Mee
      • Book: Central Bank Independence and the Legacy of the German Past
      • Online publication: 13 September 2019
      • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108759601.001
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      • Introduction
      • Simon Mee
      • Book: Central Bank Independence and the Legacy of the German Past
      • Online publication: 13 September 2019
      • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108759601.001
      Available formats
      ×

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      To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      • Introduction
      • Simon Mee
      • Book: Central Bank Independence and the Legacy of the German Past
      • Online publication: 13 September 2019
      • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108759601.001
      Available formats
      ×

Summary

When two journalists of Bild, German’s best-selling tabloid, arrived in March 2012 at the European Central Bank (ECB) to interview its president, they brought with them a special gift. It was a Pickelhaube, or Prussian military helmet, dating from the time of the Franco-Prussian War.1 The present, the journalists explained, was to remind Mario Draghi, an Italian, that the newspaper had deemed him back in 2011 as the ‘most Germanic’ of candidates in the race for the ECB’s top position. According to Bild, the manner in which Draghi pursued his career demonstrated that he was imbued with what the tabloid saw as ‘Prussian virtues’.2 This fact overcame his problematic nationality – at least in the eyes of Bild – and made him the ideal man for the job.3

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