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Chapter 2 - Professional Ethics in Obstetrics and Gynecology

from Section 1 - Professional Ethics in Obstetrics and Gynecology

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 November 2019

Laurence B. McCullough
Affiliation:
Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell
John H. Coverdale
Affiliation:
Baylor College of Medicine, Texas
Frank A. Chervenak
Affiliation:
Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell
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Summary

This chapter provides an introduction to professional ethics in obstetrics and gynecology based on the ethical concept of medicine as a profession and the ethical concepts of the female patient, pregnant patient, and fetal patient. There is also an introduction to professional ethics in perinatal medicine.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

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