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Chapter 14 - Cancer and Pregnancy

from Section 3 - Professionally Responsible Clinical Practice

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 November 2019

Laurence B. McCullough
Affiliation:
Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell
John H. Coverdale
Affiliation:
Baylor College of Medicine, Texas
Frank A. Chervenak
Affiliation:
Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell
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Summary

This chapter provides an ethical framework to guide decision making with patients about the management of pregnancy and concurrent cancer.

Cancer diagnosed during pregnancy presents the physician, pregnant woman, and her family with complex and difficult ethical challenges. The conflicting concerns between the growing fetus and the dangers of cancer raise many ethical and clinical problems unique to the management of cancer during pregnancy. This chapter draws on professional ethics in obstetrics and its ethical concept of the fetus as a patient, to provide guidance for the responsible management of these ethical challenges.

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Chapter
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

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Aulisio, MP. Double effect, principle or doctrine of. In Jennings, B, ed. Encyclopedia of Bioethics, 4th ed. Farmington Hills, MI: Gale, Cengage Learning 2014, 889894.Google Scholar

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