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12 - The Evolution of Episodic Cognition

The Sense of Time

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 July 2022

Bennett L. Schwartz
Affiliation:
Florida International University
Michael J. Beran
Affiliation:
Georgia State University
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Summary

Mental time travel involves remembering personal past events (i.e., episodic memory) and thinking about future ones (i.e., future thinking). Despite empirical evidence showing that animals might be capable of mental time travel, some still remain skeptical about this issue. The aim in this chapter will be to reflect on the concept of episodic memory and future thinking as well as on the experimental approaches used in comparative psychology to study these abilities. A critical analysis of both the conceptualization of mental time travel and the experimental paradigms will be provided. I will finish by questioning the extent to which the sense of past has been addressed in this type of research and by suggesting lines of future research.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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