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Conclusion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 April 2021

Ashok Agarwal
Affiliation:
The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH
Ralf Henkel
Affiliation:
University of the Western Cape, South Africa
Ahmad Majzoub
Affiliation:
Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha
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Summary

The second half of the twentieth century witnessed major advancements in the study of infertility. Perhaps the most prominent breakthrough was the birth of Louise Brown on July 25, 1978, the result of the first successful in vitro fertilization in humans. This marked a new era where the molecular interplay between spermatozoa and oocytes became the primary topic of interest. Since 1980, the World Health Organization (WHO) has published five editions of their Laboratory Manual for the Examination and Processing of Human Semen, which formed the basis for the evaluation of male fertility potential [1, 2, 3, 4, 5].

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

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