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Cahpter 20 - Contraception for the Perimenopausal Woman

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 June 2020

Nicholas Panay
Affiliation:
Queen Charlotte's & Chelsea Hospital, London
Paula Briggs
Affiliation:
Liverpool Women's NHS Foundation Trust
Gabor T. Kovacs
Affiliation:
Monash University, Victoria
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Summary

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines menopause as the permanent cessation of menstruation due to loss of ovarian follicular activity [1]. It is a retrospective diagnosis, which can only be made with certainty after 12 months of spontaneous amenorrhoea. The average age of menopause in UK women is 51 [2].

Type
Chapter
Information
Managing the Menopause , pp. 194 - 207
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

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Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare. Progestogen‐only pills. 2015. www.fsrh.org/documents/ceuguidanceprogestogenonlypillsGoogle Scholar
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