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Chapter 32 - Gypsy moth IPM

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 September 2010

Edward B. Radcliffe
Affiliation:
University of Minnesota
William D. Hutchison
Affiliation:
University of Minnesota
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Summary

Over the last 50 years, North American forests have been inundated by a multitude of alien pest invasions. Among these, noteworthy invaders include the hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae), emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis), chestnut blight and Dutch elm disease. These species have greatly altered both the ecological and economic values associated with forests and their management, representing perhaps the most demanding challenge facing state and federal forest pest management personnel. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) problem and describe the various approaches to managing this species, which serve as a model system for understanding the management of non-indigenous forest pests.

Gypsy moth in North America

Gypsy moth was accidentally introduced to North America over 130 years ago, but it has spread relatively slowly, currently occupying less than one-third of its potential habitat in the eastern USA. It is possible to observe at any time areas where the species has not yet established, where introduced populations are occasionally eradicated, areas at the leading edge of the expanding range where concerted efforts are directed to slow its spread, and areas where the species has been established for many years and where considerable resources are expended to suppress defoliating populations. Because the gypsy moth has a dramatic and continuing impact on the public, this species has been the target for many intense research and management programs.

Type
Chapter
Information
Integrated Pest Management
Concepts, Tactics, Strategies and Case Studies
, pp. 414 - 423
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2008

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References

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