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Improved wireless power pickup efficiency using CMOS synchronous rectifier with embedded shorting control

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 March 2017

Robert Gallichan*
Affiliation:
Auckland Bioengineering Institute, The University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
Ho Yan (Alex) Leung
Affiliation:
Auckland Bioengineering Institute, The University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
David M. Budgett
Affiliation:
Auckland Bioengineering Institute, The University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
Aiguo Patrick Hu
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
Daniel McCormick
Affiliation:
Auckland Bioengineering Institute, The University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
*
Corresponding author: R. Gallichan Email: rgal042@aucklanduni.ac.nz

Abstract

In this work, a shorting control (SC) scheme is integrated into a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) synchronous rectifier for the output voltage regulation of a wireless power supply. The rectifier is designed to operate in a parallel tuned pickup with a 500 mW output power capability for biomedical implants. Without any additional components, the proposed SC method enables the power pickup to operate with high efficiency under variable coupling conditions while maintaining the required load power to keep the output voltage constant. Desired operating conditions are achieved with increased power transfer capability at weak magnetic coupling conditions and higher power efficiency at strong coupling. A novel derivation describes the change in efficiency with SC duty ratio. Experimental validation is completed with an original custom CMOS integrated rectifier with embedded SC. It is demonstrated that the proposed SC method can increase the overall secondary pickup power transfer efficiency by 14% as the magnetic coupling increases to the stronger end.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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References

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