Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55b6f6c457-5kt27 Total loading time: 0.183 Render date: 2021-09-28T02:50:48.315Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Inheritance of evolved thiocarbamate resistance in rigid ryegrass (Lolium rigidum) populations from Australia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 July 2021

David J. Brunton*
Affiliation:
Postgraduate Student, School of Agriculture Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Glen Osmond, South Australia, Australia
Peter Boutsalis
Affiliation:
Postdoctoral Fellow, School of Agriculture Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Glen Osmond, South Australia, Australia
Gurjeet Gill
Affiliation:
Associate Professor, School of Agriculture Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Glen Osmond, South Australia, Australia
Christopher Preston
Affiliation:
Professor, School of Agriculture Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Glen Osmond, South Australia, Australia
*
Author for correspondence: David J. Brunton, School of Agriculture Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, PMB 1, Glen Osmond, SA 5064, Australia. (Email: david.brunton@adelaide.edu.au)

Abstract

Populations of rigid ryegrass (Lolium rigidum Gaudin) from southern Australia have evolved resistance to the thiocarbamate herbicide prosulfocarb. The inheritance of prosulfocarb resistance was explored by crossing resistant (R) and susceptible (S) individuals. In all families within each cross, except 16.2, the response of the F1 was intermediate between the parents, suggesting that resistance is inherited as a single, partially dominant trait. For 16.2, the response of the F1 was more similar to the S parent, suggesting resistance may be a recessive trait in this population. Segregation at the discriminating dose of 1,200 g ai ha−1 prosulfocarb in population 375-14 fit the ratio (15:1) consistent with two independent dominant alleles; in population 198-15, it fit a ratio (13:3) for two independent alleles, one dominant and one recessive; and in population EP162, it fit a ratio (9:7) for two additive dominant alleles. In contrast, segregation of population 16.2 fit a ratio (7:9) consistent with two independent recessive alleles contributing to prosulfocarb resistance. Four different patterns of resistance to prosulfocarb were identified in different R populations, with inheritance as a dominant allele, dominant and recessive, additive dominant and as an independent recessive allele. This suggests there are several different mechanisms of prosulfocarb resistance present in L. rigidum.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Weed Science Society of America

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

Associate Editor: Ian Burke, Washington State University

References

Anthony, RG, Hussey, PJ (1999) Dinitroaniline herbicide resistance and the microtubule cytoskeleton. Trends Plant Sci 4:112116 CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Boutsalis, P, Gill, GS, Preston, C (2012) Incidence of herbicide resistance in rigid ryegrass (Lolium rigidum) across southeastern Australia. Weed Technol 26:391398 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boutsalis, P, Karotam, J, Powles, SB (1999) Molecular basis of resistance to acetolactate synthase-inhibiting herbicides in Sisymbrium orientale and Brassica tournefortii. Pestic Sci 55:507516 Google Scholar
Brunton, DJ, Boutsalis, P, Gill, G, Preston, C (2019) Resistance to very-long-chain fatty-acid (VLCFA)-inhibiting herbicides in multiple field-selected rigid ryegrass (Lolium rigidum) populations. Weed Sci 67:267272 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brunton, DJ, Boutsalis, P, Gill, G, Preston, C (2020) Varying responses of field-selected herbicide-resistant rigid ryegrass (Lolium rigidum) populations to combinations of phorate with PPI herbicides. Weed Sci 68:367372 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Burnet, MWM, Hart, Q, Holtum, JAM, Powles, SB (1994) Resistance to 9 herbicide classes in a population of rigid ryegrass Lolium rigidum. Weed Sci 42:369377 Google Scholar
Busi, R, Gaines, TA, Vila-Aiub, MM, Powles, SB (2014) Inheritance of evolved resistance to a novel herbicide (pyroxasulfone). Plant Sci 217:127134 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Busi, R, Powles, SB (2013) Cross-resistance to prosulfocarb and triallate in pyroxasulfone-resistant Lolium rigidum . Pest Manag Sci 69:13791384 CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chen, J, Lu, H, Han, H, Yu, Q, Sayer, C, Powles, S (2019) Genetic inheritance of dinitroaniline resistance in an annual ryegrass population. Plant Sci 283:189194 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Darmency, H (1996) Movement of resistance genes among plants. Pages 209–220 in Brown TM, ed. Molecular Genetics and Evolution of Pesticide Resistance. Washington, DC: ACS PublicationsCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Darmency, H (2018) Genetics of herbicide resistance in weeds and crops. Pages 263–298 in Powles SB, Holtum JAM, eds. Herbicide Resistance in Plants. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heap, I (2020) The International Herbicide-Resistant Weed Database. www.weedscience.org. Accessed: April 20, 2020Google Scholar
Helps, JC, Paveley, ND, van den Bosch, F (2017) Identifying circumstances under which high insecticide dose increases or decreases resistance selection. J Theor Biol 428:153167 CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jasieniuk, M, Maxwell, BD (1994) Populations genetics and the evolution of herbicide resistance in weeds. Phytoprotection 75:2535 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jasieniuk, M, Brûlé-Babel, AL, Morrison, IN (1994) Inheritance of trifluralin resistance in green foxtail (Setaria viridis). Weed Sci 42:123127 Google Scholar
Jasieniuk, M, Brûlé-Babel, AL, Morrison, IN (1996) The evolution and genetics of herbicide resistance in weeds. Weed Sci 44:176193 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kern, AJ, Colliver, CT, Maxwell, BD, Fay, PK, Dyer, WE (1996a) Characterization of wild oat (Avena fatua L) populations and an inbred line with multiple herbicide resistance. Weed Sci 44:847852 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kern, AJ, Myers, TM, Jasieniuk, M, Murray, BG, Maxwell, BD, Dyer, WE (2002) Two recessive gene inheritance for triallate resistance in Avena fatua L. J Hered 93:4850 CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kern, AJ, Peterson, DM, Miller, EK, Colliver, CC, Dyer, WE (1996b) Triallate resistance in Avena fatua L. is due to reduced herbicide activation. Pest Biochem Physiol 56:163173 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Letouzé, A, Gasquez, J (2001) Inheritance of fenoxaprop-P-ethyl resistance in a blackgrass (Alopecurus myosuroides Huds.) population. Theor Appl Genet 103:288296 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McDonald, J (2014) Handbook of Biological Statistics. 3rd ed. Baltimore, MD: Sparky House Publishing. 305 p Google Scholar
Neve, P (2007) Challenges for herbicide resistance evolution and management: 50 years after Harper. Weed Res 47:365369 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Preston, C (2003) Inheritance and linkage of metabolism-based herbicide cross-resistance in rigid ryegrass (Lolium rigidum). Weed Sci 51:412 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Preston, C, Mallory-Smith, CA (2001) Biochemical mechanisms, inheritance, and molecular genetics of herbicide resistance in weeds. Pages 23–37 in Powles SB, Shaner DL, eds. Herbicide Resistance and World Grains. Boca Raton, FL: CRC PressCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Preston, C, Malone, JM (2015) Inheritance of resistance to 2,4-D and chlorsulfuron in a multiple-resistant population of Sisymbrium orientale . Pest Manag Sci 71:15231528 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Preston, C, Tardif, FJ, Powles, SB (1996) Multiple mechanisms and multiple herbicide resistance in Lolium rigidum. Pages 117–129 in Brown TM, ed. Molecular Genetics and Evolution of Pesticide Resistance. Washington, DC: American Chemical SocietyCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Roux, F, Gasquez, J, Reboud, X (2004) The dominance of the herbicide resistance cost in several Arabidopsis thaliana mutant lines. Genetics 166:449460 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Saini, RK, Malone, J, Gill, G, Preston, C (2017) Inheritance of evolved clethodim resistance in Lolium rigidum populations from Australia. Pest Manag Sci 73:16041610 CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Seefeldt, SS, Jensen, JE, Fuerst, EP (1995) Log-logistic analysis of herbicide dose-response relationships. Weed Technol 9:218227 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tardif, FJ, Powles, SB (1999) Effect of malathion on resistance to soil-applied herbicides in a population of rigid ryegrass (Lolium rigidum). Weed Sci 47:258261 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tardif, FJ, Preston, C, Holtum, JAM, Powles, SB (1996) Resistance to acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase-inhibiting herbicides endowed by a single major gene encoding a resistant target site in a biotype of Lolium rigidum . Aust J Plant Physiol 23:1523 Google Scholar
Warkentin, TD, Marshall, G, McKenzie, RIH, Morrison, IN (1988) Diclofop-methyl tolerance in cultivated oats (Avena sativa L.). Weed Res 28:2735 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yu, Q, Han, H, Nguyen, L, Forster, JW, Powles, SB (2009) Paraquat resistance in a Lolium rigidum population is governed by one major nuclear gene. Theor Appl Genet 118:16011608 CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Inheritance of evolved thiocarbamate resistance in rigid ryegrass (Lolium rigidum) populations from Australia
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Inheritance of evolved thiocarbamate resistance in rigid ryegrass (Lolium rigidum) populations from Australia
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Inheritance of evolved thiocarbamate resistance in rigid ryegrass (Lolium rigidum) populations from Australia
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *