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Field Growth of Fall Panicum and Witchgrass

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Jonas Vengris
Affiliation:
Dep. Plant and Soil Sci., Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01002
R.A. Damon Jr.
Affiliation:
Dep. Plant and Soil Sci., Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01002

Abstract

Fall panicum (Panicum dichotomiflorum Michx.) and witchgrass (Panicum capillare L.) emerged in naturally infested fields as early as April 30 and May 14, respectively. The shortest period between seeding and emergence was during the warmest period of the growing season. The number of days from emergence to heading decreased progressively for later seedings. After emergence witchgrass formed seedheads about 7 days earlier than fall panicum. Fall panicum emerging in the middle of July and witchgrass seedlings emerging July 25 produced mature seeds in the fall, shaded or not. Plant height, tiller number, and yield of both grasses were highest for plants emerging in May and June. Decreased light intensity delayed seed emergence, heading, and maturity of both grasses. Plant height, yields, number of tillers, and number of panicles also were decreased by shading. Fall panicum was a coarser plant than witchgrass and produced more tillers and panicles than witchgrass. Fall panicum and witchgrass seedlings emerging between June 23 and July 7 produced the most vigorous fast growing plants.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © 1976 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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References

1. Crafts, A.S. and Robbins, W.W. 1962. Weed Control. McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York. 660 pp.Google Scholar
2. Rahn, E.M., Sweet, R.D., Vengris, J., and Dunn, S. 1968. Barnyardgrass. Northeast Regional Publ., Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 368, Univ. of Delaware, Newark, Del 46 pp.Google Scholar
3. Ryle, G.J.A. 1961. Effects of light intensity on reproduction in S.48 timothy (Phleum pratense L.). Nature 191:196197.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Vengris, Jonas. 1963. The effect of time of seeding on growth and development of rough pigweed and yellow foxtail. Weeds 11:4852.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Vengris, Jonas, Kacperska-Palacz, A.E., and Livingston, R.B. 1966. Growth and development of barnyardgrass in Massachusetts. Weeds 14:299301.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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