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Endogenously induced secondary dormancy in seeds of Striga hermonthica

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Arnold H. Pieterse
Affiliation:
Royal Tropical Institute, Agriculture and Enterprise Development, Mauritskade 63, 1092 AD Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Jos A. C. Verkleij
Affiliation:
Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Department of Ecology and Ecotoxicology of Plants, De Boelelaan 1087, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

At the end of the cropping season in November 1994, Striga hermonthica seed populations were collected in northern Bénin (in the Atacora and Borgou departments). Host crops included Zea mays L. (corn), Pennisetum americanum (pearl millet), and Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench (sorghum). The seed populations were kept dry in the laboratory, and germination was tested regularly after 2 wk conditioning in the laboratory. The seeds passed through a state of primary dormancy, which was not the same for seed populations collected from Z. mays and S. bicolor fields and those collected from P. americanum fields. The length of the primary dormancy was approximately 6 mo. After passing through primary dormancy (after-ripening), the seeds later went through annual, recurrent states of secondary dormancy. Primary dormancy coincided with the dry season directly after maturity (i.e., between December 1994 and April 1995), and secondary dormancy coincided more or less with the subsequent 1995/1996 and 1996/1997 dry seasons. It is concluded that the secondary dormancy pattern was endogenous. Germination percentages during the period that coincided with the first rainy season after collection were generally higher than during the period that coincided with the second rainy season.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

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