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Effects of Management Type and Timing on Weed Suppression in Soybean No-Till Planted into Rolled-Crimped Cereal Rye

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Eric A. Nord
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Science, 109 Tyson Building, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802
Matthew R. Ryan
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Science, 109 Tyson Building, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802
William S. Curran
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Science, 109 Tyson Building, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802
David A. Mortensen
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Science, 109 Tyson Building, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802
Steven B. Mirsky
Affiliation:
Sustainable Agricultural Systems Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville MD 20705
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Knowledge of weed emergence periodicity can inform the timing and choice of weed management tactics. We tested the effects of weed management system (conventional [CNV] and herbicide-free [HF]), timing of rye sowing (two dates), timing of soybean planting (5 planting dates, 3 in each system), and supplemental control (with and without) on weed suppression and weed community composition in soybean no-till planted into a cereal rye cover crop. Cereal rye was terminated with a roller-crimper and herbicide (CNV) or with a roller-crimper alone (HF), and supplemental weed control was achieved with a postemergence glyphosate application (CNV) or with interrow high-residue cultivation (HF). Supplemental control with glyphosate in CNV was more effective than high-residue cultivation in HF. When soybean was planted on the same date, CNV resulted in less weed biomass and a more even community composition, whereas HF resulted in greater weed biomass, dominated by common ragweed. When we controlled for cereal rye biomass and compared the effects of cereal rye sowing and termination timing within each system, earlier management reduced weed biomass in HF, but tended to increase weed biomass in CNV. Our results suggest the ability to control emerged weeds prior to soybean planting is an important factor that influences the optimal cereal rye cover crop management timing for weed suppression.

Type
Weed Management
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

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Footnotes

Current address: Department of Horticulture, 222 Tyson Building, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802.

Current address: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, 515 Bradfield Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.

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Effects of Management Type and Timing on Weed Suppression in Soybean No-Till Planted into Rolled-Crimped Cereal Rye
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Effects of Management Type and Timing on Weed Suppression in Soybean No-Till Planted into Rolled-Crimped Cereal Rye
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