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The Relation of God and Man in the Writings of Nicolas Berdyaev1

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 February 2009

Extract

Nicholas Berdyaev was born in 1874 in Kiev, the cradle of Russian Christian culture. He was a scion of an aristocratic family, but while studying in Kiev, came under the influence of the writings of Kant and Hegel. While Hegel himself drew conservative conclusions from his own system, Karl Marx drew revolutionary conclusions, and the young Berdyaev followed Marx and the early Communists. Expelled from the University for these Marxist leanings, he found himself in exile in the north in company with some of the founders of Russian Communism. Yet all through his life he remained an independent and a rebel. Although he accepted the economic and political conclusions of Marxism, he rejected the dialectical materialism on which they were supposedly based, and as a result he was again exiled in 1922, this time by the Communists, after he had served as professor of philosophy in Moscow University. Most of the rest of his life was spent in exile in Paris, with the little group of Russian emigrés, but as he remained true to the Marxian analysis and critique of capitalism to the end of his days, and loathed the bourgeois order of society as cordially as any disciple of Lenin, he was naturally in little favour with them. He died there on 24th March 1948 at his writing table.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Scottish Journal of Theology Ltd 1950

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References

page 380 note 2 The information about Berdyaev's life is taken from an article by Rev. O. Fielding Clarke, one of his translators, published in The Listener, 24th 06 1948.Google Scholar

page 381 note 1 Freedom and the Spirit, Introd. p. x.Google Scholar

page 381 note 2 ibid., p. 189.

page 381 note 3 Slavery and Freedom, p. 20.Google Scholar

page 381 note 4 Transformation Three (Lindsay Drummond Ltd.).

page 381 note 5 Slavery and Freedom, p. 35.Google Scholar

page 381 note 6 ibid., p. 21.

page 382 note 1 ibid., p. 36; cf. abo Solitude of Society, p. 159 ff.Google Scholar

page 382 note 2 Slavery and Freedom, p. 45.Google Scholar

page 383 note 1 Meaning of History, p. 22.Google Scholar

page 383 note 2 Freedom of the Spirit, p. 70.Google Scholar

page 384 note 1 Meaning of History, p. 41.Google Scholar

page 384 note 2 ibid., p. 37.

page 385 note 1 Spirit and Reality, p. 131Google Scholar; cf. also Freedom of the Spirit, Chap. 7.

page 385 note 2 Freedom of the Spirit, p. 189.Google Scholar

page 385 note 3 ibid., p. 189.

page 385 note 4 Destiny of Man, p. 38.Google Scholar

page 386 note 1 George Seaver; loc. cit.

page 386 note 2 Freedom of the Spirit, p. 191.Google Scholar

page 387 note 1 ibid., p. 194.

page 387 note 2 ibid., p. 197.

page 388 note 1 ibid., p. 198.

page 388 note 2 ibid., p. 199.

page 389 note 1 Freedom of the Spirit, p. 209.Google Scholar

page 389 note 2 Destiny of Man, p. 33.Google Scholar

page 389 note 3 ibid., p. 34.

page 390 note 1 Slavery and Freedom, p. 39.Google Scholar

page 390 note 2 Destiny of Man, p. 31.Google Scholar

page 390 note 3 ibid., pp. 32–33.

page 390 note 4 Slavery and Freedom, p. 40.Google Scholar

page 392 note 1 Freedom of the Spirit, Introd.

page 394 note 1 Slavery and Freedom, p. 9.Google Scholar

page 395 note 1 ibid., p. 10.

page 395 note 2 ibid., p. 16.

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