Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-j7tnp Total loading time: 0.215 Render date: 2021-07-27T06:50:03.319Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Plasma vitamin C: what does it measure?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2007

AR Ness
Affiliation:
Senior Lecturer in Epidemiology, University of Bristol, Department of Social Medicine, Canynge Hall, Whiteladies Road, Bristol, BS8 2PR, UK
KT Khaw
Affiliation:
Professor of Clinical Gerontology, Department of Clinical GerontologyAddenbrooke's Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge, CB2 2QQ, UK
S Bingham
Affiliation:
Senior Scientist, MRC Dunn Clinical Nutrition Centre, Hills Road, Cambridge, CB2 2DH, UK
NE Day
Affiliation:
Professor of Public Health, Institute of Public Health, University Forvie Site, Robinson Way, Cambridge, CB2 2SR, UK
Corresponding
E-mail address:
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Objective:

To examine the association between self-reported consumption of foods and plasma vitamin C levels.

Design:

A cross-sectional analysis of dietary data and plasma vitamin C levels. Subjects placed the following foods into frequency categories: fresh fruit, leafy greens, other vegetables, fatty fish, other fish, chicken, meat, meat products, eggs, cheese and brown bread. The six frequency categories ranged from ‘never’ to ‘at least daily’. Plasma vitamin C was measured by fluorometric assay.

Setting:

A population-based cohort study in Norfolk, UK.

Subjects:

598 men and 566 women aged 45–74 years not taking vitamin supplements.

Results:

Plasma vitamin C was positively correlated with intake of fresh fruit (r = 0.29 in men and r = 0.25 in women, P < 0.001), leafy greens (r = 0.20 in men P < 0.001, r = 0.13 in women P < 0.01), other vegetables (r = 0.20 in men P < 0.001, r = 0.14 in women P < 0.01) and brown bread (r = 0.28 in men, r = 0.17 in women, P < 0.001) and negatively associated with intake of meat products (r = −0.13 in men P = 0.02, r = −0.10 in women P < 0.01). The difference in plasma vitamin C between never and daily eaters of brown bread was 13.6 μmol l−1 in men and 9.9 μmol l−1 in women, P < 0.001

Conclusions:

These data suggest that plasma vitamin C is not only a marker of foods rich in vitamin C but of certain patterns of food consumption. Such patterns are likely to be population specific and might explain inconsistencies in biomarker–disease associations.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © CABI Publishing 1999

References

1Pearce, N, de Sanjose, S, Boffetta, P, Kogevinas, M, Saracci, R, Savitz, D. Limitations of biomarkers of exposure in cancer epidemiology. Epidemiology 1995; 6: 190–4.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
2Bates, CJThurnham, DI. Biochemical markers of nutrient intake. In: Margetts, BM, Nelson, M, eds. Design Concepts in Nutritional Epidemiology. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991: 192265.Google Scholar
3Gregory, J, Foster, K, Tyler, H, Wiseman, M. The Dietary and Nutritional Survey of British Adults. London: HMSO, 1990.Google Scholar
4Riboli, E. Nutrition and cancer: background and rationale of the European prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Ann. Oncol. 1992; 3: 783–91.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5Key, TJA, Oakes, S, Davey, G, Moore, J, Edmond, LM, McLoone, UJ, Thurnham, DI. Stability of vitamins A, C, E, carotenoids, lipids, and testosterone in whole blood stored at 4C for 6 and 24 hours before separation of serum and plasma. Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prevention 1996; 5: 811–14.Google Scholar
6Vuilleumier, JP, Keck, E. Fluorometric assay of vitamin C in biological materials using a centrifugal analyser with fluorescence attachment. J. Micronutr. Analys. 1989; 5: 2534.Google Scholar
7SPSS Inc. SPSS for Windows, release 6.0. Chicago, USA: 1993.Google Scholar
8Bolland, B, Welch, AA, Unwin, ID, Buss, DH, Paul, AA, Southgate, DAT. McCance and Widdowson's The Composition of Foods, fifth edition. London: Royal Society of Chemistry, 1991.Google Scholar
9Jacob, RA, Otradovec, CL, Russell, RM et al. Vitamin C status and nutrient interactions in a healthy elderly population. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 1988; 48: 1436–42.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10Heseker, H, Schneider, R. Requirement and supply of vitamin C, E and β-carotene for elderly men and women. Eur. J. Clin. Nutr. 1994; 48: 118–27.Google Scholar
11Bingham, SE, Gill, C, Welch, A, et al. Validation of dietary assessment in the UK arm of EPIC using weighed records, and 24-hour urinary nitrogen and potassium and serum vitamin C and carotenoids as biomarkers. Int. J. Epidemiol. 1997; 26 (suppl. 1): S137S151.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
You have Access
14
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Plasma vitamin C: what does it measure?
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Plasma vitamin C: what does it measure?
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Plasma vitamin C: what does it measure?
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *