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Effects of revision of Japanese food composition tables on estimation of nutrient intakes, with reference to age-dependent differences

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2007

Naoko Matsuda-Inoguchi
Affiliation:
Department of Food and Nutrition, Kyoto Women's University, Kyoto, Japan
Shinichiro Shimbo
Affiliation:
Department of Food and Nutrition, Kyoto Women's University, Kyoto, Japan
Haruo Nakatsuka
Affiliation:
Miyagi University, Taiwa-cho, Japan
Takao Watanabe
Affiliation:
Miyagi University of Education, Sendai, Japan
Kae Higashikawa
Affiliation:
Kyoto Industrial Health Association, 67 Nishinokyo-Kitatsuboicho, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto 604-8472, Japan
Masayuki Ikeda*
Affiliation:
Kyoto Industrial Health Association, 67 Nishinokyo-Kitatsuboicho, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto 604-8472, Japan
*Corresponding
*Corresponding author: Email ikeda@kyotokojohokenkai.or.jp
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Abstract

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Objective:

To identify effects of revision of the Japanese food composition tables from the fourth version to the fifth version on nutrient intake estimation.

Design:

A database on 783 samples of 24-hour food duplicate portions was re-visited. Nutrients in the duplicate portions were estimated by use of the fourth and fifth versions of the Japanese food composition tables in parallel, together with supplemental use of other databases. The two sets of estimates were subjected to comparison.

Setting:

The sample collection was conducted at 31 sites all over Japan.

Subjects:

The sample donors were 783 women aged 20–78 years.

Results:

Compared with the estimates by use of the fourth version of the tables, the estimates by the fifth version were substantially higher for intakes of energy, carbohydrate, dietary fibre, vitamin A and niacin, and lower for iron intake. The increase in carbohydrate intake estimates was more evident in older women than in young women, whereas the decrease in the intake estimation of iron and the increase in that of dietary fibre were more marked in young women than in older women.

Conclusion:

The recent revision of food composition tables in Japan induced substantial changes in the estimation of nutrient intakes, i.e. an increase in energy, carbohydrate, dietary fibre, vitamin A and niacin, and a decrease in iron. The extent of the changes varied depending on age.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2004

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