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Evaluating the implementation and impact of a healthier checkout programme at a regional convenience store chain

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 April 2021

Barbara Baquero
Affiliation:
Department of Health Services, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA
Elizabeth Anderson Steeves
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, University of Tennessee, 1215 W. Cumberland Ave., Jessie Harris Room 229, Knoxville, TN 37996-1920, USA
Michele Polacsek
Affiliation:
Westbrook College of Health Professions, University of New England, Portland, ME, USA
Molly De Marco
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
Leah Chapman
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
Lucia A Leone
Affiliation:
Department of Community Health and Health Behavior, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA
Caitlin Simon
Affiliation:
Partnership for a Healthier America, Washington, DC, USA
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Objective:

To test the feasibility of implementing and evaluating a healthier checkout pilot study in a convenience store chain.

Design:

A quasi-experimental study was conducted comparing a 3-month ‘healthier checkouts’ intervention in ten convenience stores which stocked eight healthier items in the checkout space and ten comparison stores assigned to continue stocking their current checkout space product mix. All aspects of the intervention were implemented by the retailer. The research team conducted in-person fidelity checks to assess implementation. Sales data were collected from the retailer in order to compare mean baseline to intervention sales of the eight healthier items in intervention and comparison groups while controlling for overall store sales.

Setting:

Convenience store chain.

Participants:

Twenty convenience stores in New Hampshire.

Results:

The increases in sales of healthier items between the baseline and intervention periods among the intervention and comparison stores were not statistically significant; however, the overall pattern of the results showed promising changes that should be expanded on in future studies. Intervention fidelity checks indicated that results may have been attenuated by variability in intervention implementation.

Conclusions:

This study advances the evidence for effective promotion of healthier food purchases in the convenience store chain setting and adds to the current literature on retail checkout space interventions. Additional research is needed to confirm and expand these results.

Type
Research paper
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

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