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Energy drink intake is associated with insomnia and decreased daytime functioning in young adult females

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 July 2020

Georgina SA Trapp
Affiliation:
Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia School of Population and Global Health, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Miriam Hurworth
Affiliation:
Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Peter Jacoby
Affiliation:
Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Kathleen Maddison
Affiliation:
Centre for Sleep Science, School of Human Sciences, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia West Australian Sleep Disorders Research Institute, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Karina Allen
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, UK Eating Disorders Service, Maudsley Hospital, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK
Karen Martin
Affiliation:
School of Population and Global Health, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Hayley Christian
Affiliation:
Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia School of Population and Global Health, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Gina L Ambrosini
Affiliation:
Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia School of Population and Global Health, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Wendy Oddy
Affiliation:
Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
Peter R Eastwood
Affiliation:
Centre for Sleep Science, School of Human Sciences, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia West Australian Sleep Disorders Research Institute, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Corresponding

Abstract

Objective:

To investigate the association between energy drink (ED) use and sleep-related disturbances in a population-based sample of young adults from the Raine Study.

Design:

Analysis of cross-sectional data obtained from self-administered questionnaires to assess ED use and sleep disturbance (Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ-10) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Symptoms Questionnaire–Insomnia (PSSQ-I)). Regression modelling was used to estimate the effect of ED use on sleep disturbances. All models adjusted for various potential confounders.

Setting:

Western Australia.

Participants:

Males and females, aged 22 years, from Raine Study Gen2–22 year follow-up.

Results:

Of the 1115 participants, 66 % were never/rare users (i.e. <once/month) of ED, 17·0 % were occasional users (i.e. >once/month to <once/week) and 17 % were frequent users (≥once/week). Compared with females, a greater proportion of males used ED occasionally (19 % v. 15 %) or frequently (24 % v. 11 %). Among females, frequent ED users experienced significantly higher symptoms of daytime sleepiness (FOSQ-10: β = 0·93, 95 % CI 0·32, 1·54, P = 0·003) and were five times more likely to experience insomnia (PSSQ-I: OR = 5·10, 95 % CI 1·81, 14·35, P = 0·002) compared with never/rare users. No significant associations were observed in males for any sleep outcomes.

Conclusions:

We found a positive association between ED use and sleep disturbances in young adult females. Given the importance of sleep for overall health, and ever-increasing ED use, intervention strategies are needed to curb ED use in young adults, particularly females. Further research is needed to determine causation and elucidate reasons for gender-specific findings.

Type
Research paper
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020

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Footnotes

Georgina SA Trapp and Miriam Hurworth are co-first authors.

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Energy drink intake is associated with insomnia and decreased daytime functioning in young adult females
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