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Vitamin E and meat quality

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 February 2007

Patrick A. Morrissey
Affiliation:
Departments of Nutrition and Food Technology, University College, Cork, Republic of Ireland
Denis J. Buckley
Affiliation:
Departments of Nutrition and Food Technology, University College, Cork, Republic of Ireland
P. J. A. Sheehy
Affiliation:
Departments of Nutrition and Food Technology, University College, Cork, Republic of Ireland
F. J. Monahan
Affiliation:
Department of Food Science and Technology, University of California, Davis, CA, USA
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Abstract

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Symposium on ‘The role of meat in the human diet’
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1994

References

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