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Top food sources of energy and nutrients-to-limit among Latin Americans: Latin American Study of Nutrition and Health Study (ELANS) 2014–2015

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 June 2020

Regina Mara Fisberg
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
Ana Carolina Leme
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
Aline Veroneze de Mello
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
Cristiane Salles
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
Angela Arroyo
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Escuela de Nutricíon Y Dietética, Universidad de Valparaíso, Valparaíso, Chile
Georgina Gómez
Affiliation:
Departamento de Bioquímica, Escuela de Medicina, Universidad de Costa Rica, San José, Costa Rica
Irina Kovalskys
Affiliation:
Committee of Nutrition and Wellbeing, International Life Science Institute, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Rossina Gabriella Pareja Torres
Affiliation:
Instituto de Investigación Nutricional, La Molina, Lima, Peru
Martha Cecilia Yépez García
Affiliation:
Colegio de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Quito, Ecuador
Lilia Yadira Cortés Sanabria
Affiliation:
Departamento de Nutrición y Bioquímica, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia
Marianella Herrera-Cuenca
Affiliation:
Centro de Estudios del Desarrollo, Universidad Central de Venezuela (CENDES-UCV)/Fundación Bengoa, Caracas, Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of
Attilio Rigotti
Affiliation:
Centro de Nutrición Molecular y Enfermedades Crónicas, Departamento de Nutrición, Diabetes y Metabolismo, Escuela de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica, Santiago, Chile
Mauro Fisberg
Affiliation:
Instituto Pensi, Fundação Jose Luiz Egydio Setubal, Sabará Hospital Infantil, São Paulo, Brazil
ELANS Group ELANS Group
Affiliation:
Instituto Pensi, Fundação Jose Luiz Egydio Setubal, Sabará Hospital Infantil, São Paulo, Brazil
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Abstract

Introduction

Although evidence shows some decrease in energy intake, consumption of added sugars, solid fat acids (SFA), and sodium are still high among Latin Americans. This study evaluated top food sources contributing to the percentage of energy and nutrients-to-limit among Latin Americans.

Materials and Methods

Latin American Study of Nutrition and Health (ELANS) cross-sectional included 9,218 adults from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela. 24h-recalls were used and foods were identified via adaptation of “What We Eat in America” system. Food sources of energy and nutrient-to-limit were ranked based on the percentage of intake contribution.

Results

Argentina energy food sources were pizza (11.8%), and meats (5.7%); added sugars were sweetened beverages (14.3%), and quick breads (12.4%); SFA was pizza (22.2%) and meats (7.8%); and sodium was pizza (15.5%), and soup (7.6%). Brazil energy sources were alcoholic beverages (9.3%), and pizza (6.9%); added sugars were sweetened beverages (14.7%) and desserts (14.3%); SFA and sodium were pizza (9.0% and 9.9%) and sandwiches (9.4%). Chile energy sources were pizza (11.9%) and grain-based dishes (5.6%); added sugars were sweet bakeries (16.6%) and sweetened beverages (13.8%); SFA and sodium were pizza (19.6% and 21.2%) and sandwiches (7.4% and 7.7%). Colombia energy sources were pizza (6.6%) and alcoholic beverages (5.6%); added sugars were snacks (15.2%) and desserts (12.9%); SFA were desserts (9.7%) and pizza (7.6%); and sodium were soups (11.8%) and pizza (10.5%). Costa Rica energy sources were pizza (8.7%) and alcoholic beverages (6.9%), added sugars were sweetened beverages (13.0%) and candy (10.5%); SFA was pizza (12.0%) and Mexican dishes (8.9%); and sodium was pizza (13.5%) and sandwiches (8.8%). Ecuador energy sources were grain dishes (7.7%) and alcoholic beverages (6.8%), added sugars were sweetened beverages (14.6%) and desserts (12.6%), SFA was pizza (8.8%) and grain-based dishes (7.5%), and sodium were Asian dishes (10.4%) and grain-based dishes (9.2%). Peru energy sources were grain-based dishes (8.9%) and alcoholic beverages (8.2%), added sugars were yogurts (18.6%) and sweetened beverages (14.3%), SFA was pizza (8.6%) and sandwiches (8.1%), and sodium were grain-based dishes (17.2%) and cooked grains (14.9%). Venezuela energy sources were grain-based dishes (6.9%) and alcoholic beverages (6.1%), added sugars were sweetened beverages (13.5%) and desserts (11.3%), SFA were grain-based dishes (11.3%) and meats (7.7%), and sodium were sandwiches (9.0%) and grain-based dishes (7.9%).

Discussion

Awareness of food sources is critical for designing strategies to help Latin Americans meet nutrient recommendations within energy needs.

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Abstract
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Copyright © The Authors 2020
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