Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-56f9d74cfd-5k9ck Total loading time: 0.326 Render date: 2022-06-28T01:13:25.056Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Physical activity: the earlier the better. Bones awareness

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 June 2020

Iris Iglesia Altaba
Affiliation:
Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development (GENUD) Research Group, Universidad de Zaragoza Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Zaragoza, Spain Red de Salud Materno Infantil y del Desarrollo (SAMID), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain
Pilar Ferrer Santos
Affiliation:
Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development (GENUD) Research Group, Universidad de Zaragoza Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Zaragoza, Spain
María Luisa Miguel-Berges
Affiliation:
Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development (GENUD) Research Group, Universidad de Zaragoza, España 2 Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Zaragoza, Spain
Paloma Flores Barrantes
Affiliation:
Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development (GENUD) Research Group, Universidad de Zaragoza, España 2 Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Zaragoza, Spain
Pilar Samper Villagrasa
Affiliation:
Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development (GENUD) Research Group, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain Department of Pediatrics, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain
Gerardo Rodríguez Martínez
Affiliation:
Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development (GENUD) Research Group, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain Hospital Clínico Universitario Lozano Blesa, Zaragoza, Spain
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.
Introduction

There is scarce research on bone health in early stages due to the difficulties in accessing to bone health assessment methods in absence of pathology conditions. Consequently, there is no much information on the determinants of bone health. The aim of this study is to elucidate the association of moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and bone mineral density of children from Aragon accounting for socioeconomic, role parental modelling, dietary and sedentary behavior effects.

Material & Methods

The longitudinal cohort ‘Growth and Feeding during Lactation and Early Childhood in Children of Aragon (CALINA in Spanish)’ included 1,629 born children from Aragon (Spain) in 2009. From those, after 7 years, 339 children (176 boys and 163 girls) were assessed. Bone mineral density (BMD) using Dual X-ray absorciometry (–DXA-), diet quality index (DQI) using a food frequency questionnaire(-FFQ-), sedentary behaviors by questionnaire, and physical activity (using accelerometry-actigraph 3GTX-) were evaluated, as well as if they were or not rapid weight gainers during the first year of life.

Results

From the 339 children, 116 boys (66.5%) and 63 girls (38.7%) met the current MVPA recommendations of at least? 1 hour/day. Boys meeting MVPA recommendations did a mean of 84.02 minutes of MVPA per day and had a BMD of 0.60 g/cm2, while those not meeting the recommendations, did a mean of 43.91 minutes of MVPA and had a BMD of 0.59 g/cm2. Girls meeting MVPA recommendation did 75.52 minutes and had a BMD of 0.59 g/cm2, and those not meeting, did 42.81 minutes of MVPA and had a BMD of 0.58. Models, include BMI z-score (age/sex adjusted based in Anthro standards from WHO), weekly sedentary time, DQI, BMI of the mother and whether or not they had been rapid weight gainers from 0–12months as confounders and were performed for BMD having MVPA as a predictor. A significant association was found only for boys between MVPA and BMD (β = 0.145, p-value = 0.02) while no association was found for girls (β = 0.06, p-value = 0.40).

Discussion

There is still an important physical activity gap between boys and girls. In boys, physical activity is positively associated with BMD, whereas in girls, no significant associations seem to exist. More research is required to elucidated the effects of lifestyle behaviors on bone health in children.

Type
Abstract
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2020
You have Access

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Physical activity: the earlier the better. Bones awareness
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Physical activity: the earlier the better. Bones awareness
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Physical activity: the earlier the better. Bones awareness
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *