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Nutritional implications of a meatless diet

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 August 2018

T. A. B. Sanders
Affiliation:
Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, King's College London, University of London, Campden Hill Road, London W8 7AH
Sheela Reddy
Affiliation:
Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, King's College London, University of London, Campden Hill Road, London W8 7AH
P. J. A. Sheehy
Affiliation:
Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, King's College London, University of London, Campden Hill Road, London W8 7AH
F. J. Monahan
Affiliation:
Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, King's College London, University of London, Campden Hill Road, London W8 7AH
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Abstract

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Symposium on ‘The role of meat in the human diet’
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1994

References

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