Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-4k54s Total loading time: 0.304 Render date: 2021-11-29T01:10:59.872Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

The metabolic activity of the gut microbiota and the impact of gluten free diet in children with coeliac disease

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 May 2014

M. Makinder
Affiliation:
Human Nutrition, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Yorkhill Hospital, G3 8SJ
M. Kassara
Affiliation:
Human Nutrition, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Yorkhill Hospital, G3 8SJ
A. Karanikolou
Affiliation:
Human Nutrition, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Yorkhill Hospital, G3 8SJ
O. Biskou
Affiliation:
Human Nutrition, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Yorkhill Hospital, G3 8SJ
E. Buchanan
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition, Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Yorkhill, G3 8SJ
T. Cardigan
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition, Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Yorkhill, G3 8SJ
H. Duncan
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition, Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Yorkhill, G3 8SJ
P. McGrogan
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition, Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Yorkhill, G3 8SJ
C. A. Edwards
Affiliation:
Human Nutrition, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Yorkhill Hospital, G3 8SJ
K. Gerasimidis
Affiliation:
Human Nutrition, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Yorkhill Hospital, G3 8SJ
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Type
Abstract
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2014 

The role of the gut microbiota in coeliac disease (CD) is unclear and evidence remains inconclusive( Reference Stene 1 , Reference Collado 2 ). This study investigated the metabolic activity of the gut microbiota in patients with long standing CD (LS), healthy siblings of CD patients (HS), newly diagnosed CD patients (ND) followed from diagnosis up to one year of gluten free diet (GFD) and healthy controls (HC).

Faecal pH and faecal concentration of ammonia, short chain fatty acids (SCFA), branched chain fatty acids (BCFA), lactate (L and D lactate), and free and total sulphide were measured in spot samples. ND patients provided up to 3 samples (at diagnosis, 6 and 12 month on GFD).

Forty three (23 females, age 9.3 ± 4.3) LS, 23 HS (13 females, age 9 ± 4.6), 11(6 females, 11.4 ± 2.4) ND and 57 HC (30 females, age 8 ± 4.2) participated in the study. The concentrations of propionate (p = 0.024), butyrate (p = 0.004) and valerate (p = 0.011) were significantly lower in the LS group than in HC (Table). Similarly, the concentrations of all BCFA were significantly reduced (iso-butyrate p = 0.016, iso-valeric p = 0.039, iso-caproic p = 0.025) in the LS group compared with HC (Table). There were no statistically significant differences in the concentration of SCFA and BCFA between LS and HS. Total sulphide was significantly increased in the LS group compared to the HC group (p = 0.027).

Table. SCFA and BCFA concentrations in all groups

* p < 0.05 compared with HC.

No significant changes were observed in the concentrations of SCFA in ND during GFD. However, compared to disease diagnosis, faecal sulphide significantly increased after 6 (p = 0.014) and 12 months on GFD (p = 0.022).

Major changes were observed in the concentration of faecal bacterial metabolites between children with LS and HC. The reason for these differences is not yet clear but may be explained by the resolution of gastrointestinal malabsorption and the different dietary patterns of those who adhere to a gluten free diet.

This study was funded by the Nutricia Research Foundation.

References

1. Stene, LC et al. (2006) Am J Gastroenterol 101(10), 2333–40.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Collado, MC et al. (2007) Curr Issues Intest Microbiol 8(1), 914.Google Scholar
Figure 0

Table. SCFA and BCFA concentrations in all groups

You have Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The metabolic activity of the gut microbiota and the impact of gluten free diet in children with coeliac disease
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The metabolic activity of the gut microbiota and the impact of gluten free diet in children with coeliac disease
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The metabolic activity of the gut microbiota and the impact of gluten free diet in children with coeliac disease
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *