Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-7bjf6 Total loading time: 0.243 Render date: 2021-07-27T00:28:39.833Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Knowledge and perceptions of low-calorie sweeteners in an adult population

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 September 2017

C. Logue
Affiliation:
Northern Ireland Centre of Food and Health (NICHE), School of Biomedical Sciences, Ulster University, Coleraine, Northern Ireland BT52 1SA
M. O'Mahony
Affiliation:
Northern Ireland Centre of Food and Health (NICHE), School of Biomedical Sciences, Ulster University, Coleraine, Northern Ireland BT52 1SA
E. Phair
Affiliation:
Northern Ireland Centre of Food and Health (NICHE), School of Biomedical Sciences, Ulster University, Coleraine, Northern Ireland BT52 1SA
H. Dougherty
Affiliation:
Northern Ireland Centre of Food and Health (NICHE), School of Biomedical Sciences, Ulster University, Coleraine, Northern Ireland BT52 1SA
C. McDaid
Affiliation:
Northern Ireland Centre of Food and Health (NICHE), School of Biomedical Sciences, Ulster University, Coleraine, Northern Ireland BT52 1SA
A.M. Gallagher
Affiliation:
Northern Ireland Centre of Food and Health (NICHE), School of Biomedical Sciences, Ulster University, Coleraine, Northern Ireland BT52 1SA
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Type
Abstract
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2017 

Low-calorie sweeteners (LCSs) are commonly used to provide a sweet taste that is comparable to sugars but with reduced energy and minimal effects on glycaemia( Reference Fernstrom 1 , Reference Wiebe, Padwal and Field 2 ). As such, they have become increasingly prevalent in today's consumer market( Reference Zygler, Wasik and Namies'nik 3 ) and are often used as a weight management tool( Reference Miller and Perez 4 ) or by individuals with diabetes mellitus( Reference Wiebe, Padwal and Field 2 ). Following a stringent safety assessment, an acceptable daily intake (ADI) is usually assigned for each LCS prior to approval for use( Reference Logue, Dowey and Strain 5 ); however debate persists around the benefits and risks of LCS consumption. Dietitians’ perceptions of LCSs were recently investigated revealing a diversity of attitudes( Reference Harricharan, Wills and Metzger 6 ). However, limited scientific data are available on consumer attitudes towards LCSs and therefore the present study aimed to assess knowledge and perceptions of LCSs within an adult population.

A cross sectional study was conducted via the administration of an online survey comprising thirty-five questions designed to collect information on demographics, knowledge and perceptions of LCSs. The survey was disseminated among staff and students at the Ulster University by email and to a wider audience via social media sites. Statistical analysis, including Chi Square test, was conducted using SPSS to explore relationships between knowledge and perceptions of LCSs and P < 0·05 was considered statistically significant.

A total of 741 individuals (282 M; 459 F) completed the survey between March-July 2016. Of these, 73·5 % (n 545) reported being aware of LCSs; however, participants could identify average of 2·0 (SD; 1·9) LCSs from the list LCSs approved for use in Europe. Furthermore, the majority of participants (89·2 %; n 661) reported being unaware of an ADI for LCSs. With regards to perceptions of LCSs, 34·3 % (n = 254) were of the opinion that LCS should not be used and 20·9 % (n 155) were of the opinion that they should be used; the remainder (44·8 %; n 332) declared no opinion on LCS use. Those who were ‘aware of ADI’ were more likely to have a positive perception of LCSs than those who were unaware or unsure of ADI (Fig. 1; P < 0·001).

Fig. 1. Perceptions of LCS use by awareness of ADI.

A high level of awareness of LCSs was observed within this population; however there appeared to be a relative lack of awareness of specific LCSs, as well as an important regulatory aspect of LCSs i.e. ADI. This was associated with a more negative perception of LCSs suggesting that improved education around LCSs might improve acceptability within the general population.

References

1. Fernstrom, J.D. (2015) Ann Rev Food Sci Technol 6, 119136.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Wiebe, N., Padwal, R., Field, C., et al. (2011) BMC Med 9, 123.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Zygler, A., Wasik, A. & Namies'nik, J (2009) Trends Anal Chem 28(9), 10821102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Miller, P.E. & Perez, V. (2014) Am J Clin Nutr 100(3), 765777.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Logue, C., Dowey, L.C., Strain, J.J. et al. (2016) Proc Nutr Soc 75(2), 216225.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Harricharan, M., Wills, J., Metzger, N., et al. (2014) Eur J Public Health 25(3), 472476.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
You have Access
1
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Knowledge and perceptions of low-calorie sweeteners in an adult population
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Knowledge and perceptions of low-calorie sweeteners in an adult population
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Knowledge and perceptions of low-calorie sweeteners in an adult population
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *