Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-564cf476b6-lwxm7 Total loading time: 0.24 Render date: 2021-06-20T05:53:00.895Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Home Parenteral Nutrition (HPN): An international benchmarking exercise

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 January 2012

J. P. Baxter
Affiliation:
HPN network, Dundee, United Kingdom
L. Gillanders
Affiliation:
Nutrition Services, Auckland City Hospital, New Zealand
K. Angstmann
Affiliation:
Sydney, Australia
M. Staun
Affiliation:
Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark
C. O'hanlon
Affiliation:
Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland
T. Smith
Affiliation:
Southampton General Hospital, Southampton
F. Joly
Affiliation:
Hopital Beaujon, Paris, France
P. Thul
Affiliation:
Charite Hospital, Berlin, Germany
C. Jonkers
Affiliation:
Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands
K. Gardiner
Affiliation:
Belfast City Hospital, Belfast, United Kingdom
S. Klek
Affiliation:
University Medical College, Krakow, Poland
C. Cuerda
Affiliation:
Hospital General Universitario, Madrid, Spain
W. Magambo
Affiliation:
University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, United Kingdom
A. van Gossum
Affiliation:
Erasme Hospital, Brussels, Belgium
L. Pironi
Affiliation:
University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Type
Abstract
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2012

The provision of adult Home Parenteral Nutrition (HPN) in Scotland, New Zealand and Denmark has been described by comparing country registries. The aim of the present study is to examine HPN prevalence and organisation across as selection of countries. Colleagues were asked to complete a questionnaire for their respective country. Point (31st December 2010) and 2010 period prevalence; number of centres (defined as managing more than five patients); organised care i.e. adherence to protocols or standards; referral pathways, national guidelines, education programmes and indications for HPN were examined.

Responses were received from 15 countries (see table) treating an estimated 8930 patients.

Eight countries (53%) had published HPN guidelines; of the 7 who did not, 4 (27%) had adopted guidelines such as ESPEN. Eleven (73%) had an HPN educational programme in place*. The most common underlying disease for HPN were ischaemia, Crohns' disease, motility disorders and cancer (adults); and in children enteropathy, motility and inflammatory bowel disease. There is a variation in HPN practice but most countries had developed their own clinical guidelines or standards or used international society guideline to improve patient care. Several have under reported the HPN prevalence as registries are not available or used.

You have Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Home Parenteral Nutrition (HPN): An international benchmarking exercise
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Home Parenteral Nutrition (HPN): An international benchmarking exercise
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Home Parenteral Nutrition (HPN): An international benchmarking exercise
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *